Nobody saw this coming

Homepage Forums Small Talk Nobody saw this coming

This topic contains 165 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  Unseen 2 days, 6 hours ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 136 through 150 (of 166 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #50428

    Unseen
    Participant

    Another sign of The Warning’s greatness:

    Covers of their songs are starting to appear:

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 4 weeks ago by  Unseen.
    #50429

    Unseen
    Participant

    The Warning is the best rock band to come along since The Beatles and the reason is simple and has nothing to do with their musicianship, Band Maid has more technically proficient musicians, for example.

    Where The Warning excels all other rock bands since The Beatles is in their songwriting. I dare anyone to name a band which so consistently writes great songs, each with a hook/earworm that you can sing in the shower or hum to oneself while folding the laundry.

    Other bands make the occasional song like that but The Warning, in their mature period (Queen of the Murder Scene on) does it every single time.

    That is what makes them great and sets them apart from every other rock band since The Beatles. Not even The Rolling Stones, who many consider the greatest rock band of all time, can make that claim.

    #50437

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    Readers Poll 2023: Paulina “Pau” Villarreal Vélez Wins “Up And Coming”

    Nice photo of her. Short article in Modern Drummer. I looked it up after hearing they interviewed her for a podcast episode, but it’s yet not been posted as I write this. (I’ve never seen “Vélez” in the name before.)

    #50438

    Unseen
    Participant

    Readers Poll 2023: Paulina “Pau” Villarreal Vélez Wins “Up And Coming” Nice photo of her. Short article in Modern Drummer. I looked it up after hearing they interviewed her for a podcast episode, but it’s yet not been posted as I write this. (I’ve never seen “Vélez” in the name before.)

    Sometimes it’s given as a middle name and sometimes as a last name. In their Wikipedia entry it’s given as their last name for all three girls. I don’t know enough about Mexican naming conventions to guess why this is.

    #50439

    Unseen
    Participant

    @popebeanie

    Okay, I think I’ve got the name thing sorted now.

    “Mexican names follow Spanish naming customs: [personal name(s)] [father’s paternal family name] [mother’s paternal family name].”  (source)

    Using only two of their three names is probably a bow to naming conventions among English-speaking northerners where we leave the mother’s maiden last name out of it.

     

    #50443

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    Oh wow, nice! I’ll pay more attention now to who honors that, especially anyone close to them. Their mother has been involved with the group, e.g. helping to get their words and grammar right in their Spanish songs. I heard one of them, Dany?, say they feel they know English better than Spanish, although outsiders presume that Spanish is their primary language.

    I have an American friend who goes to Mexico often on business, and I’ve started talking to him piecemeal in Spanish, hoping to revive some of my three years of high school Spanish, of which I’ve forgotten 99%. His specialty in was in listening to broadcasts (and other speech) in Spanish and translating them into English for military intelligence purposes. He was down there during Noriega days. (I scored high enough on a test to get invited to language school in Monterey California for the Air Force, but I chose ECM training instead, back when electronic stealth, e.g. radar invisibility, was getting more sophisticated.)

    Thanks for the link to the cultural atlas too! Looks comprehensive enough to learn a lot. On another tangent, kinda, one of my pet peeves is hearing 90% of reactors mispronounce “Teatro”. Vowels in Spanish and other languages are so simple compared to English, or (say) Chinese (wrt pitch), although they remain simple in Japanese. I’ve also learned that mispronouncing words when speaking in another language is important when trying to be understood. Spanish pronounce the westernized pronunciation of “Japanese” like “hah-poh-nay-say”. Japanese, having trouble with Ls and Rs and only knowing a similar sound that’s in between L and R (like a soft “d” or “ree”) don’t understand me saying the word “California” unless I use Japanese vowel and consonant pronunciations.

    Four vowel sounds “a, e, i, o, u” are simple as hell in several languages other than English:
    A = ah (like in Aha)
    E = ay (like in hey)
    I = ee (like in we)
    O = o (like in oh)
    U = oo (like in boo)

    Teatro Metropolitan = “Tay-ah-troh May-troh-poh-lee-tahn”.

    I hate constantly hearing “tea-tro”, like tea leaves. But we Americans are way off on a lot of other pronunciations, like San Francisco. It’s originally Sahn Frahn-see-skoh! And Narcisista is pronounced Nar-see-see-stah. Then there’s Mar-tee-ree-oh. Even mispronouncing Japanese “kah-rah-oh-kay” as “carry-oh-kee” bugs me. Dislike of mispronunciation of other languages is my personal curse. I know, only I care that much, so it’s my problem.

    I understand that so few people question the language and pronunciations used in the culture they grow up in and strive so hard to fit into. I think I became disappointed with careless pronunciations when I was in first and second grade in Georgia, and no one even tried to pronounce my name “properly”. And much later, as an adult visiting Tennessee, often the first question when meeting someone was “So what charch do ya go tah?”. While almost every culture first assumes that foreigners aren’t as intelligent as they are, when they don’t pronounce words “properly”. And this human trait to insist on “perfect” language is where grammar nazis, err, grammar mavins are coming from. Admittedly, that’s where my mispronunciation pet peeve is also coming from.

    #50444

    Unseen
    Participant

    Oh wow, nice! I’ll pay more attention now to who honors that, especially anyone close to them. Their mother has been involved with the group, e.g. helping to get their words and grammar right in their Spanish songs. I heard one of them, Dany?, say they feel they know English better than Spanish, although outsiders presume that Spanish is their primary language.

    I think they are comfortable in both, but I assume Spanish is their primary language if only because they live in a Spanish-speaking country. If you see a video of them out with family and friends they speak Spanish with the occasional English word or phrase thrown in. English is so ubiquitous that in all Western countries as well as many in Asia English words and phrases are used at least as often as the equivalent in the local language, if there even is one. For example: okay, blue jeans, rock and roll, weekend, computer, smartphone, hardware, information technology, accounting, fashion show, basketball, goodbye, hello, thank you, etc. The word “pizza” is Italian in origin but most of the world adopted it through English, not directly from Italy.

    In my comments to TW reactors, I’ve been trying to explain how to pronounce Teatro Metropolitan, though I also include which syllables to stress (“Tay” and “pole”) along with explaining that “CDMX” is just shorthand for “Mexico City” similar to “NYC” being short for “New York City.”

    It’s true that in most other languages the pronunciation of vowels is far more standardized than in English. The reason in English—at least in large part—has to do with the fact that English is a whore when it comes to borrowing words and expressions from other languages, sometimes keeping the original pronunciation but sometimes butchering it. It would be hard to utter a colloquial paragraph of 100+ words in English without including some word borrowed from another language and substituted for an originally English word, or used due to the lack of an equivalent. German, French, Italian, Spanish, even Indian-origin words abound in the colloquial lexicon.

    Examples of words adopted from other languages because there is no equivalent in native English include avocado (Nahuatl), banana (Wolof), coffee (Arabic), karaoke (Japanese), ketchup/catsup (Chinese), lemon (Arabic), margarita (Spanish), pizza (Italian), salsa (Spanish), and robot (Czech), among thousand upon thousands of others. There’s a reason none of those words appear in the works of Chaucer, Shakespeare, Dickens, or E.M. Forster.

    Sorry, I guess I got carried away and the post wandered pretty far afield from The Warning.

    #50447

    @popebeanie – And much later, as an adult visiting Tennessee, often the first question when meeting someone was “So what charch do ya go tah?”.

    I hope you told them to go and ‘Have a blessed day’. That’s what I say in Georgia 🙂

    #50479

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    I hope you told them to go and ‘Have a blessed day’. That’s what I say in Georgia 🙂

    I’ve thought of that, but it wouldn’t feel sincere.

    Maybe something like “I believe in the Church of FSM. But we don’t try to convert non-believers, so you need to look it up on the internets, and decide for yourself.”.

    Or you know, maybe with your permission, we could make some cards with Reg the Fronkey Farmer on top, and a QR code below that links to Sunday School. I would totally love leaving them at bus stops and on park benches! Could I add “Pope Beanie Approves” to it?

    I like the one that google chrome creates, with a dinosaur in the center.

    Hey Friends! Just aim your cellphone’s camera at the QR code below, and then click on the option to take you to our wonderful Sunday School website!

    But I wouldn’t leave cards near any neighborhoods with known active militias. Or, like, toss them into pickup truck beds flying Trump flags.

    #50495

    Unseen
    Participant

    @ PopeBeanie

    I thought Rick Beato had been ignoring The Warning but I was wrong. Back on May 12 he interviewed The Warning with David Bendeth* on David’s channel. I gather Bendeth engineered their music recently. The “mixing contest” involves giving people the tracks to The Warning’s song “Money” and then judging the mixes they were sent. You can listen to this leadup if  you wish. The interview with the girls begins around 31:30.

    * David Bendeth is a multi-platinum award-winning record producer, songwriter, and musician. He has produced and mixed albums for some of the biggest names in rock music, including Paramore, Breaking Benjamin, Bring Me the Horizon, Papa Roach, and I Prevail. His work has sold over 60 million records worldwide.

    Bendeth was born in Stoke Newington, London, England, in 1954. He began his career as a musician, playing guitar in various bands in the 1970s. In 1980, he had a solo hit with the single “Feel the Real.”

    In the mid-1980s, Bendeth began working as a producer and mixer. He quickly gained a reputation for his ability to create a big, bold sound that was perfect for rock music. His early production credits include albums by Vertical Horizon, Hedley, and Of Mice & Men.

    In the early 2000s, Bendeth began working with Paramore. He produced their first three albums, “Riot!”, “Brand New Eyes,” and “All We Know Is Falling.” These albums helped to launch Paramore into one of the biggest rock bands in the world.

    Bendeth has also worked with a wide range of other artists, including Elvis Presley, Killswitch Engage, In Flames, The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus, Hawthorne Heights, Underoath, A Day To Remember, Taking Back Sunday, Chiodos, The Almost, All Time Low, and Bruce Hornsby.

    Bendeth is known for his hands-on approach to production. He is involved in every aspect of the recording process, from songwriting to arrangement to mixing. He is also known for his ability to get the best out of his artists.

    Bendeth is one of the most respected producers in rock music today. His work has helped to shape the sound of the genre for over two decades.

    #50518

    Unseen
    Participant

    The Warning’s October 7th concert in Bogota. Full concert.

    #50577

    Unseen
    Participant

    Pau gives a rundown of the tech side of the band. Pau is far more than “just the drummer.” She is the band’s brain, basically. While songs are collaborations, Pau is the de facto arranger, which she does at a piano. She also is the team’s Ableton programmer. You’ll be amazed at how much control she has during the live shows!

    This reactor also reacts to Red Hands Never Fade from their Queen of the Murder Scene album:

    Astounding videos of Pau on drums taken by someone who must be associated with the band because they’ve done many videos of them. Their Youtube channel has literally dozens of videos of the band going back six years.

    Speaking of those videos, here’s one from their most recent concert done about as well as a nonprofessional can do it. At least the sound is halfway decent and the camera is very close to the stage. They bring their crew and their parents out on stage at the end:

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by  Unseen.
    #50587

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    I thought Rick Beato had been ignoring The Warning but I was wrong. Back on May 12 he interviewed The Warning with David Bendeth* on David’s channel.

    I mentioned that interview a while ago, and is why I mentioned Bendeth’s involvement and that Beato’s not ignoring them. But I didn’t post it because it’s so long and the interview with The Warning is relatively short, and more fun than informative music-wise. I also didn’t get much even from the technical side of it, when they’re listening to and commenting on various mixes of one song. I actually skipped a lot of it. Even with studio headphones on, I couldn’t hear all the nuances of audio mixing that they could hear.

    But for this topic that you created, I still regard our posts as a kind of historic recounting of what The Warning is, and what it’s becoming.

    So I was actually hoping you’d eventually take the baton from me. 🙂

    Hey, for all the non-disciples out there, if you ignore The Warning, I know in my heart that they will find you, and help you see the light!

    I’ll definitely watch the other videos you posted. I save them for times I’m looking for a “pick me up”.

    #50589

    Unseen
    Participant

    still regard our posts as a kind of historic recounting of what The Warning is, and what it’s becoming.

    It’s like a Brussels sprout morphing into a head of cabbage, isn’t it?

    #50590

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    It’s like a Brussels sprout morphing into a head of cabbage, isn’t it?

    LOL wow, I feel that now too! And I’ll bet the band would get that, and laugh. 🙂

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by  PopeBeanie. Reason: tons of typos fixes, just like my previous post. i'm done now, i promise
Viewing 15 posts - 136 through 150 (of 166 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.