Why I'm skeptical about the UFO phenomenon

Homepage Forums Small Talk Why I'm skeptical about the UFO phenomenon

This topic contains 37 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  PopeBeanie 7 months, 1 week ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 38 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #48488

    Unseen
    Participant

    We live in an age where cameras are sophisticated and almost anyone with a camera as lowly as a cell phone can take a razor-sharp image of just about anything. Our government can read a license plate number from an orbiting satellite.

    So, why are so many UFO images either a blur or, if sharp, something any mildly adept photographer can fake either in the field or in a photo editor? As early as the 1950’s, Hollywood could produce nice sharp images of UFO’s that were out of their special effects departments.

    I’m not denying that UFO’s exist nor am I asserting that they are some sort of government conspiracy. I simply don’t understand why in order to believe in them, we have to base our beliefs at least in part on “evidence” consisting of blurry images or images fabricated out of hubcaps or pie tins.

    Take a look at this image which is supposed to be a clear image of a UFO, I don’t even think one needs to be a photographer to analyze away this image as probably a homemade artifact designed to look like a flying saucer and hung from a crane or something similar using fishing line. The shadow alone, cast onto the path below, indicates that the object is close and too small to house any but the tiniest alien creatures.

    I’m tired of looking at blurry smudges or obvious fakes and being TOLD they are alien spacecraft. I’d really like to SEE one in a convincing photo with a backstory that makes the image convincing.

    The trouble is there’s a good reason to doubt almost anything nowadays since almost anything can be faked or deep faked. For example, while I myself don’t doubt the moon landings, There’s little about the images that came from the landings that couldn’t be faked.

    Thus, I don’t put moon landing skeptics in the same category as the flat earth dummies or the stolen election airheads. The moon landings could have been faked. I just doubt that they were for a variety of reasons. However, all clear images of UFOs I’ve seen look fake and probably are.

    #48491

    TheEncogitationer
    Participant

    Unseen,

    I’m not denying that UFO’s exist nor am I asserting that they are some sort of government conspiracy. I simply don’t understand why in order to believe in them, we have to base our beliefs at least in part on “evidence” consisting of blurry images or images fabricated out of hubcaps or pie tins.

    The short answer is that no rational being has to believe anything without sufficient evidence, and that includes claims that UFOs are Ezekiel’s wheel in the sky or space aliens or Vril from The Hollow Earth.

    Real pics plus physical evidence plus contact with the beings behind them, all subject to open independent, reproducable corroboration by any observer, or it never happened.

    #48526

    RichRaelian
    Participant

    Hi! Because you want to know not believe.

    #48527

    jakelafort
    Participant

    Rich Raelian is no Episcopalian.

    The antidote to faith.

    #48558

    Unseen
    Participant

    Okay, so if this is true, SHOW US!!!

    The article referenced above: Intelligence Officials Say U.S. Has Retrieved Craft of Non-Human Origin

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  Unseen.
    #48585

    Unseen
    Participant

    Not every expert is buying the FBI “whistleblower,” and one of them has been an FBI Special Agent himself.

     

    #48587

    Unseen
    Participant

    It just keeps getting interestinger and interestinger. One this is perfectly clear: SOMBODY IS LYING!

    If this is true and acquisition of such devices is this common, then Russia, China, and other governments have them and are certainly trying to reverse engineer them. This explains the national security aspect.

    #48598

    If it turns out that there are strange footprints on any of the starboard bows then I might get interested.  Bear in mind that ye cannae change the laws of physics, laws of physics, Jim.

    #48600

    Unseen
    Participant

    If it turns out that there are strange footprints on any of the starboard bows then I might get interested. Bear in mind that ye cannae change the laws of physics, laws of physics, Jim.

    Yeah, if they’re from some star far, far away, then it probably took them anywhere from 10 years at half the speed of light to maybe hundreds, thousands, maybe even hundreds of thousands of years to get here.

    Then, their space craft gets a flat tire. What shitty luck!

    See why I’m a skeptic? (And, no, I don’t think even aliens can use wormholes for space travel. Prove me wrong.)

    #48604

    Unseen
    Participant

    Is this “revelation” just some sort of psy op to scare the bejeezus out of our enemies? Or is it a ploy to get more money for defense?

    #48608

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    See why I’m a skeptic?

    A thousand years is a drop in the bucket, e.g. wrt the time frame of human evolution. Recent science and tech is updating so quickly, perhaps even at an exponential pace; is it even possible to imagine how far it could go in only the next hundred years? Not to mention AI, and possibly self-replicating AI machines the size of, I dunno, maybe a marble? Shoot a dozen such marbles aimed at planets that your super-mega-ultra JWST has detected intelligent life on (e.g. by detecting a specific kind of air pollution or other evidence), and you’ll get your genetic or AI seeds far, fast, and wide in only a thousand years.

    Aliens won’t be coming in the huge, warp speed spaceships that we’ve fantasized about in science fiction.

    #48612

    Unseen
    Participant

    @PB

    I’m sure technological advances will continue coming and that some of those in the future would look like magic to people of today, though history has shown that the advances we think will show up seldom do so, or when they do turn up, we’re often underwhelmed. The things we didn’t anticipate at all turn out to be Earth-shattering. Things like microchips and the Internet.

    Remember holograms? Three dimensional video displays created out of light? You would have thought back then that holograms would be everywhere by now. Frankly, I’ve never seen a hologram. I wouldn’t even know where to go to see one. WTF?

    I may be proven wrong someday in the future, but no physicist I’m aware of thinks there’s any way around the known laws of physics allowing for faster than light flight, much less instantaneous “Beam me across the Universe, Scotty”-type intergalactic travel, even using quantum entanglement.

    The “worm hole”—a favorite sci fi trope—is certainly impossible to use if it is inside a black hole, because going into a black hole is fatal (ever heard of “spaghettification”?).

    The bipedal two legs/two arms body plan is a good one to result in a highly technological race, so if aliens do arrive, there’s a chance they’ll have a bipedal body plan and look somewhat humanoid. Octopuses, dolphins and crows are quite bright but have physical limitations and/or environmental requirements preventing them from obtaining a level of high technology comparable to ours. Intelligent beings on other planets might be more intelligent in some ways but due to the limitations of their body plan or environment (aquatic, for example) be incapable of leaving their planet.

    At any rate, my point is that there’s much more logic to remaining skeptical than to being pollyannical (which may be a neologism, but I think its meaning is obvious).

    • This reply was modified 1 year ago by  Unseen.
    #48614

    michael17
    Participant

    Luke 21:26

    King James Version

    26 Men’s hearts failing them for fear, and for looking after those things which are coming on the earth: for the powers of heaven shall be shaken

    The Olivet prophecies are spot on!

    #48616

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    At any rate, my point is that there’s much more logic to remaining skeptical than to being pollyannical (which may be a neologism, but I think its meaning is obvious).

    Yeah, I pretty much already knew those points. I won’t reiterate mine, while I’m hoping someone will find them interesting enough to delve into. Like really, imagine all the DNA one could preserve and fit into a space marble someday, right? And all that artificial evolution on the way…

    I’m increasingly neologismistic, partly to buck traditional rules that just don’t seem as important to me as they do to most English teachers. Sometimes I can’t remember the “right” word or phrase to use. I like seeing the rules being broken, especially when the violation is obviously meaningful and not accidental. (The word accidental just now reminds me of on of my favorites: AxyDental.)

    #48621

    Unseen
    Participant

    @PB

    I love neologisms. My current favorite is “flexing” meaning showing off one’s wealth or success. Wearing a Rolex, driving a Bentley, hiring a live-in housekeeper, etc.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 38 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.