Bookish atheists

Favorite book ever read.

This topic contains 7 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Simon Mathews 5 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #1535

    Winter Lily
    Participant

    What is your most favorite book that you’ve ever read and why?

    I’ll start. For me it’s hard because I can’t choose just one but if I had to I’d say Aristotle And Dante Discover The Secrets Of The Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz because it pulled at my heart strings. It was so beautifully written.

    • This topic was modified 5 years, 1 month ago by  Winter Lily.
    #1538

    .
    Spectator

    I think Albuquerque by Rudolfo Anaya….because I feel at home when I read it…

    I’m missing home today…

    #1586

    .
    Spectator

    I just finished My Fight / Your Fight by Ronda Rousey….AMAZING book for any young woman to read….she is a huge inspiration to me!

    #1592

    Beth
    Participant

    @Winter Lily I read that book too and I cried at the end it was so beautiful!
    My favorite book(s) ever is the His Dark Materials trilogy by Philip Pullman. I love how he takes the theme of original sin and turns it completely upside down.

    #1594

    Simon Mathews
    Participant

    My favourite book is Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger. An excellently observed portrayal of disaffected youth. It’s funny but with a tinge of sadness underneath it all.

    #1614

    Simon Paynton
    Participant

    I have several favourite books of all time, as we all probably do. One that I would save from a fire is “The Road to Reality” by Roger Penrose, who is number 2 to Steven Hawking as a mathematical physicist. I’ve done half of a maths degree, and I can only understand the first chapter of this big thick book. My sweet heart gave it to me when we got together, and she wrote the date in the front.

    I also love “Fam – rolling in a London girl gang” by Chyna. A real slice of inner city gang life, written as a novel but everything in it actually happened, and it has the ring of truth and some choice London slang throughout.

    For another rollicking English read, two more favourites are “Tom Jones” and “Joseph Andrews” by Henry Fielding, written in the 18th century, and both long, exciting and funny.

    #1615

    Winter Lily
    Participant

    @simonm I tried to read Catcher In The Rye but I couldn’t finish it because the almost constant swearing was becoming annoying and the book didn’t seem to go anywhere.

    • This reply was modified 5 years, 1 month ago by  Winter Lily.
    #1618

    Simon Mathews
    Participant

    @earthheart, I know what you mean about it not going anywhere. The plot is very meandering and somewhat random. I like it for that reason though. For me, that fits in with the personality of Holden’s character and what he is struggling with. It would not be considered a classic story-arc.

    However, you and I must have a different take on swearing because it is very tame by today’s standards. It’s a long time since I’ve read it but isn’t it mostly terms such as “crumby” and other non-offensive words?

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