Teens Allowed Gender Reassignment Without Parental Consent…WTF?!!!

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Belle Rose 6 months ago.

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  • #41076

    Unseen
    Participant

    Refer to this article.

    From the article:

    The Oregon Health Authority (HERC) has passed a policy that allows teens 15 and older to begin the process of sex reassignment through access to cross-sex hormones and sex reassignment surgeries without parental consent.
     
    Subsidized by the state’s Medicaid program, the HERC estimates the cost of this program to be $150,000 per year.
     
    The policy passed without being offered to the public for debate, yet transgender rights activists like Jenn Burleton, who helped create the Portland-based TransActive Gender Center, support the policy. Burleton believes it will decrease suicide rates among young teens.

    In the U.S., kids can’t get a driver’s license or go on a school field trip without parental consent. Generally, they can’t consent to medical treatment, either, so this is an exception.

    How do you feel about this?

     

    • This topic was modified 6 months ago by  Unseen.
    #41078

    Autumn
    Participant

    What’s the value of public debate or parental consent here? If there’s cause for concern it might be that doctors unfamiliar with proper diagnostic protocols could be too quick to issue prescriptions, and safeguards should be put in place for that. But this is a case where prejudice and bigotry are sadly quite likely to interfere with what is a medical issue, and that is problematic.

    Conventionally, in those cases, young people either give into their parents potentially resulting in harm, or they end up in complicated legal battles with one or more parents. In some cases that might become a custody battle, or it may be a battle over whether the teenager can consent to medical treatment on their own, which is not unprecedented. Seeing as we already have frameworks for that, it seems the process could be streamlined.

    #41080

    Unseen
    Participant

    What’s the value of public debate or parental consent here? If there’s cause for concern it might be that doctors unfamiliar with proper diagnostic protocols could be too quick to issue prescriptions, and safeguards should be put in place for that. But this is a case where prejudice and bigotry are sadly quite likely to interfere with what is a medical issue, and that is problematic. Conventionally, in those cases, young people either give into their parents potentially resulting in harm, or they end up in complicated legal battles with one or more parents. In some cases that might become a custody battle, or it may be a battle over whether the teenager can consent to medical treatment on their own, which is not unprecedented. Seeing as we already have frameworks for that, it seems the process could be streamlined.

    Granted, but my child can’t get any other medical work done without my consent, which may be given or withheld unwisely, possibly with dire or life-changing consequences. At least, many such mistakes are reversible or remediable. Children can’t sign contracts, largely because they generally can’t think about long-term consequences as well as full adults.

    I’m not sure a lifetime change from one gender to the other is a decision a 15 year old is equipped to make. It can’t be undone but can be done without suspending the normal procedures not  so many years later. What’s the rush?

    • This reply was modified 6 months ago by  Unseen.
    • This reply was modified 6 months ago by  Unseen.
    • This reply was modified 6 months ago by  Unseen.
    #41086

    Autumn
    Participant

    So, this is a policy shift that has been in effect for seven years. It seems to involve a few components.

    i) Transition related care and treatment for gender dysphoria are covered under public health insurance.
    ii) The age for consent to mental health care is fourteen.
    iii) The age of medical consent is fifteen.

    My understanding is the patient information is confidential and cannot be unduly disclosed, not even to parents.

    The Oregon Health Plan states:

    What is the age of consent for mental health?
    In Oregon, age of medical consent for mental health care is 14 years old. Meaning, people who are 14 can consent themselves to treatment for gender dysphoria without requiring parental consent. This is one year younger than the age of medical consent which is 15.

    What is a “thorough psychosocial assessment”?
    Each clinician will need to determine what they consider to be a thorough psychosocial assessment. The WPATH standards of care outline very thoroughly what should be included in letters referring patients for hormones or surgery and this is generally a good guide. It is important to note the Oregon Health Plan requires specific written documentation (letters), including the phrases “persistent, well-documented gender dysphoria,” and “have the capacity to make a fully informed decision and under Oregon law are able to give consent for treatment,” and “have any significant medical or mental health concerns reasonably well controlled.”

    What is meant by “persistent, well-documented gender dysphoria?”
    This is something that each clinician will need to make a decision about. We would refer clinicians to the WPATH standards of care for more guidance.

    This does leave a lot of room for physicians to use their discretion for better or worse. When it comes to gender dysphoria and medical transition, finding the appropriate balance of checks and balances without excessive gatekeeping is a complicated issue.

    It’s been a long time since I’ve read the WPATH Standards of Care. The latest version is nearly a decade old now, and may actually be a bit dated what with new studies constantly emerging. It possibly trends more conservative than some contemporary thinking on treating gender dysphoria in youth, though I’m not qualified to say whether that is good or bad.

    For reference:
    https://www.wpath.org/media/cms/Documents/SOC%20v7/SOC%20V7_English.pdf

    #41090

    Autumn
    Participant
    I didn’t see this post.

    Granted, but my child can’t get any other medical work done without my consent, which may be given or withheld unwisely, possibly with dire or life-changing consequences.

    Apparently in Oregon they can. It’s going to vary jurisdiction by jurisdiction. In Washington the age of medical consent is 13. I know in parts of Canada youth can be conditionally granted the ability to give informed consent.

    At least, many such mistakes are reversible or remediable. Children can’t sign contracts, largely because they generally can’t think about long-term consequences as well as full adults. I’m not sure a lifetime change from one gender to the other is a decision a 15 year old is equipped to make. It can’t be undone but can be done without suspending the normal procedures not so many years later. What’s the rush?

    Puberty is the rush. One way or another, a series of reversible, partially reversible, and irreversible changes will take place. Going through the wrong set of changes for that individual will result in psychological stress, the need for possibly greater medical intervention down the road, and potentially lifelong consequences such as increased risk of depression, anxiety, and suicide attempts.

    #41099

    Unseen
    Participant

    Puberty is the rush. One way or another, a series of reversible, partially reversible, and irreversible changes will take place. Going through the wrong set of changes for that individual will result in psychological stress, the need for possibly greater medical intervention down the road, and potentially lifelong consequences such as increased risk of depression, anxiety, and suicide attempts.

    There’s an awful lot of speculation about possibly this and possibly that in there. I don’t mean to be flip, but teens commit suicide over all kinds of things, romantic breakups (the #1 cause), not being accepted at their university of choice, being bullied. Allowing a teen to make such a drastic decision without so much as a parental consultation seems extreme.  You devote a decade and a half or more providing for the child you love, then the state swoops in and forces you out of the picture implying that somehow they know what’s best for your child and you don’t.

    Maybe THEY should commit suicide(?)!

    • This reply was modified 6 months ago by  Unseen.
    #41104

    Autumn
    Participant

    Puberty is the rush. One way or another, a series of reversible, partially reversible, and irreversible changes will take place. Going through the wrong set of changes for that individual will result in psychological stress, the need for possibly greater medical intervention down the road, and potentially lifelong consequences such as increased risk of depression, anxiety, and suicide attempts.

    There’s an awful lot of speculation about possibly this and possibly that in there. I don’t mean to be flip, but teens commit suicide over all kinds of things, romantic breakups (the #1 cause), not being accepted at their university of choice, being bullied.

    No, it isn’t speculation. There is elevated risk of suicidality in teens and adults who struggle with gender identity, specifically those who experience gender dysphoria. While medical transition is not categorically the right course of treatment for everyone, studies have shown it to reduce rates of depression, anxiety, suicidality, and the need for serious clinical intervention for mental health issues in many individuals for whom it is a suitable treatment.

    Allowing a teen to make such a drastic decision without so much as a parental consultation seems extreme. You devote a decade and a half or more providing for the child you love, then the state swoops in and forces you out of the picture implying that somehow they know what’s best for your child and you don’t. Maybe THEY should commit suicide(?)!

    The state doesn’t ‘swoop in’. Teenagers can seek mental health and medical support from licensed professionals for a known condition. Under ideal circumstances, one would involve their parents and they could have open and honest conversations in an environment that supports the well-being over the child over dominance of the child or asserting religious values (or similar) even if detrimental to the child’s health. That won’t always be the case. While the state doesn’t “swoop in”, it does have an interest in assuring that resources are there to support the well-being of teenagers rather than prioritize the feelings of parents in these cases.

    #41117

    Belle Rose
    Participant

    There’s even some things in WA can do and parents don’t have to consent and aren’t even allowed to know unless the teen signs off at 13!!! I hate it. As a parent I have a right to know what’s going on with my own kid. I hate laws like this. It makes parenting that much harder

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