Amazing scientific facts most people will find hard to believe

Homepage Forums Science Amazing scientific facts most people will find hard to believe

This topic contains 23 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Unseen 2 months, 3 weeks ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 16 through 24 (of 24 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #36009

    Unseen
    Participant

    Cats are far more linguistically complex than dogs. Dogs have around 10 distinct woofs barks, yowls, and yelps, but with cats their meows, yowls, growls, clicks, chirps, chatters, cackles, etc., add up to nearly 100.

    Wild cats don’t meow once they assume maturity. Domestic cats meow because being around people has taught them that it works.

    #36012

    Davis
    Moderator

    Vox has a hilarious article about cats here.

    I know it’s only half serious but after owning both cats and dogs this article pretty much sums up my feelings on the subject. Of course I have known insanely attentive and affectionate cats but I also owned a total lazy bitchy selfish mean unemotional manipulative cat too. Her untimely death was sad but hardly as traumatic as when I lost my first dog (the worst moment of my life).

    #36017

    Unseen
    Participant

    Her untimely death was sad but hardly as traumatic as when I lost my first dog (the worst moment of my life).

    Then I sincerely hope your parents are still alive.

    #36018

    Unseen
    Participant

    As long as I can remember, I’ve found cats totally fascinating. If I’m in the room with one, if it’s awake and active, I can hardly take my eyes off it. Dogs…ho hum.

    • This reply was modified 3 months ago by  Unseen.
    #36019

    Davis
    Moderator

    Yeah I’m certainly very fortunate to still have my parents both alive. It will certainly eclipse losing my best friend “snoopy” when I was younger.

    #36021

    Unseen
    Participant

    Davis, that slanderous article about cats was full of shit. The fact is, experts are arriving at the conclusion that DOGS are, I’ll use their words, “social parasites.” who have domesticated man to their advantage.

    One of America’s best science journalists, Stephen Budiansky, wrote about this genomic research in a cover article for The Atlantic magazine in July 1999 entitled “The Truth About Dogs,” which he expanded into a book with the same title published in 2000. Budiansky laid out a powerful case that “the conventional explanations of where dogs come from, how they ended up in our homes and why they do what they do for us” were all wrong.

    Instead of the notion that over the past 40,000 years, mankind domesticated wolves into present-day dogs, Budiansky says evidence strongly suggests that “proto-dogs” cultivated mankind, intuitively grasping that “mooching off people” beat “fighting it out in the wild.” Early humans, “with their campfires and garbage heaps and hunting practices, but above all with their social interactions, represented an ecological niche ripe for exploitation,” Budiansky wrote. Dogs had a secret weapon in winning over humans: human nature, specifically our near-compulsive anthropomorphism — our habit of attributing human behaviors, emotions or intentions to nonhuman entities. (Source)

    I could quote that article further, but I’ll state a couple obvious facts. First, owning a dog is like owning a slave, and in fact, we use that terminology: dog and master. Dogs fall into the same two niches of slaves, the field nigger and the house nigger. The working dogs and the plain ole ordinary pets. They do have one advantage over cats and I’m unsure whether man bred it into them or if it was selected for via unnatural selection, and that is their uncanny ability to mimic human facial  expressions, an ability to my knowledge, otherwise belonging to primates.

    Finally, I’m tired of the slanderous old saw that cats don’t emotionally bond with their humans (unlike dogs, cats have no “master”). Watch how much this cat “doesn’t care” about her human getting up and leaving. I would call this separation anxiety:

    https://www.facebook.com/thomas.hunscher/videos/10208451141328328

     

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 4 weeks ago by  Unseen.
    #36026

    Davis
    Moderator

    Unseen I had said the article is only half serious. Having said that, it is half serious so you might not want to just discard everything in it just because you don’t like it.

    #36027

    Unseen
    Participant

    Unseen I had said the article is only half serious. Having said that, it is half serious so you might not want to just discard everything in it just because you don’t like it.

    My reply was intended as tongue-in-cheek as well. I thought my over the top opening line would signal as much. I actually love dogs as well as cats, and were I a little younger and more able, I might have one, but the low maintenance of cats suits me best at this stage in my life.

    If I were to get an animal “friend” for my cat, a dog would be a better choice than another cat because cats are territorial and asking two cats to share a space is asking for something nature never intended and which often enough doesn’t work out. Inevitably, when two cats share a space, one will be the Alpha and the other the Beta. A dog and cat can be equals. A dog can be a buddy and playmate in a way a second cat is unlikely ever to be.

    Rest assured, I don’t hate dogs. But they ARE social parasites. Adorable ones to be sure.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 4 weeks ago by  Unseen.
    #36076

    Unseen
    Participant

    You know, those gorgeous Hubble Telescope images of nebulae, supernovae, etc., are all LIES!

    Space is mostly black and white. NASA adds the color.

Viewing 9 posts - 16 through 24 (of 24 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.