For The Americans Here

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This topic contains 9 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Davis 4 months, 1 week ago.

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  • #10019

    Unseen
    Participant

    BECAUSE…

    Because some progressives boycotted or voted for candidates with no chance as a way of expressing their dissatisfaction with the leading choices. Because we have a wacky electoral college system that gives the votes of the most backward parts of the country (“the middle”) a little extra weight. Because a con man huckster promised pie in the sky and made backroom deals with evangelical Republicans.

    Because of all that, the Supreme Court is taking a sharp turn to the right, populated by Justices who are out of tune with an electorate that is overwhelmingly pro-choice and which believes that climate change is largely human-caused and which does not believe that America’s gun violence problem can be solved by “thoughts and prayers” and background checks.

    Because of all that, an increasingly dark-skinned and socially liberal electorate will constantly find that they are forced to live in an evangelical Christian America.

    Forget the GOP. The GOP could take a turn somewhat more to the left and still be conservative, but whenever anything shows up in the Supreme Court, the decision will favor the views of Justices who will tend to vote along evangelical Christian lines. Most of the Justices seem to have a pro-Big Business slant as well, which doesn’t bode well for laws designed to protect not just the planet, but the electorate as well.

    And this is unlikely to change even under a Democrat President and a Democrat-dominated legislature.

    Is this the way democracy is supposed to work? Sure looks like oppression to me.

    #10029

    _Robert_
    Participant

    Because the colonists had a serious distaste for a central governments and kings and queens that they did set up our voting system so that each state holds it’s own presidential election within it’s own borders and then casts it’s votes as a state.

    And yes the republicans work the system way better than the dems. I would not be surprised if there are big right-wing shifts concerning abortion, pre-existing conditions clauses/Obama-care, gay rights and pot even if Trump loses the next election.

    #10035

    Davis
    Participant

    had a serious distaste for a central governments

    This is America’s slight strength and biggest weakness.

    And yes the republicans work the system

    Because of the over-representation of rural areas with an overwealming traditional conservative world view, it means the democrats have to fight much much harder to win. The republicans don’t necesarily work the system harder (gerrymandering and focusing on state-legislatures) they just have the work the system less than the democrats.

    I would not be surprised if there are big right-wing shifts concerning abortion, pre-existing conditions clauses/Obama-care, gay rights and pot

    This seems inevitable

    even if Trump loses the next election.

    The younger more progressive generation will become voters sooner than we think (as always happens).

    It’s always extremely fascinating how Canadians who share/adopt so much of American culture and has shared a friendly border for so long…can be so radically…and I mean RADICALLY different on social/political/globalist issues. Canada’s most conservative Prime Minister (Harper) would seem like a total democrat in most states. It’s true Canada never had a revolution against England nor a civil war nor military conquests…but that’s not enough to explain the difference.

    And yes, boycotting a vote is usually (though not always) very foolish.

    • This reply was modified 4 months, 1 week ago by  Davis.
    #10039

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    […] how Canadians who share/adopt so much of American culture and has shared a friendly border for so long…can be so radically…and I mean RADICALLY different on social/political/globalist issues.

    Trump and other ugly ‘Mericans don’t care much about preserving American goodwill. I looked around for “make america suck” or something else relevant and humorous and cynical. The video below skips 2-1/2 minutes for you, to a Canada meme. (Someday I might not cringe at the truth in the first couple of minutes of it.)

    #10040

    Unseen
    Participant

    It’s always extremely fascinating how Canadians who share/adopt so much of American culture and has shared a friendly border for so long…can be so radically…and I mean RADICALLY different on social/political/globalist issues.

    Some and perhaps much of that may come from a Canadian to mark out areas of difference, despite the fact that for a variety of reasons, they are a lot very much like Americans, sharing a lot of culture as well as a large land mass.

    #10041

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    btw One of the few things I actually “hate” is a lot of country music, because it’s so stereotypically self-obsessed and provincial. But at least this song has some self-reflection in it, and applies larger context (other than just the stereotypical Christian God).

    #10042

    Unseen
    Participant

    Trump and other ugly ‘Mericans don’t care much about preserving American goodwill. I looked around for “make america suck” or something else relevant and humorous and cynical. The video below skips 2-1/2 minutes for you, to a Canada meme. (Someday I might not cringe at the truth in the first couple of minutes of it.)

    To be sung to the tune of England Swings by Roger Miller:

    America sucks like a lamp-er-ay do.
    Breast augmentation, cheap heroin, too.
    McDonald’s fast food, wars without end.
    Separating folks from their little chil-dren.

    Anyone care to add more lyrics?

    #10048

    Davis
    Participant

    Poitically, socially and per globalism Canada is immensely different from the United States. Heathcare was insitutionalised decades ago, the state gives generously to the disabled, single mothers and many other groups needing help. Job security is more protected. You are usually helped by the government if having a full income is unlikely. University education is far more affordable and accessible.  The political parties (more than two) compared to the US are relatively close together meaning a lot less partisanship and ugly politics. Few deny climate change. It is a thoroughly secular country. Gay marriage came out years ago, and not because the supreme court forced it, but by lawmakers. Marijuana has just been legalised across the country. Euthanasia is legalised (to some extent). Citizens  are far more aware of global geopolitics (and can point most countries out on a map). Political donations to parties is extremely limited. They are far more likely to be bilingual. They are better traveled. Score higher on nearly all student comprehensive exams. And thats just a summary. Unseen, these are not insignificant differences. These are enormous differences, that radically affect the way people live, their quality of life and their world view.

    I said from the beginning, culturally Canada and America are very similar with Canada adopting a lot of American culture and on the surface you’d barely know if you were in Vancouver or Seattle. There is an enormous border and many shared interests. And until Trump showed up, political relations have been exemplary. Below the surface is a different world. How Canada became a more politically moderate, egalitarian, inclusive, supportive, right to abort and to die, super secular and globally aware, is a question that is worth exploring.

    #10051

    Unseen
    Participant

    I said from the beginning, culturally Canada and America are very similar with Canada adopting a lot of American culture and on the surface you’d barely know if you were in Vancouver or Seattle.

    That’s what I was talking about. A middle-class neighborhood in Toronto and one across Lake Erie in Cleveland wouldn’t immediately scream out which country it was in. Shopping malls, too, not only very similar, but with some of the same shops as well. Cars on the streets in both countries a mix of well-known American and Asian brands.

    But then you’d start noticing slight differences. So slight that you might perhaps wonder if you were in a mildly alternative universe. Police uniforms with different symbology (a maple leaf rather than some red-white-and-blue, for example), different license plates, things like that.

    In terms of social policy and governmental philosophies, the differences are vast.

    #10052

    Davis
    Participant

    All right. I missunderstood your earlier reply.  Yeah I agree with your examples of shopping malls and the police etc.

    Despite showboating Canada, that isn’t to say the country is necessarily better. The United States really does offer more opportunities especially in the business world, but also with some higher education, research and development. There is also a much more notable upward mobility (especially with the scale of the difference between the lowest 10% and the highest 10%). America is a thousand times more influential, shares it’s culture (and to a lesser extent its values) a lot more than Canada and for the most part buying homes, cars, cigarettes and alcohol (and filling those cars up) is easier and relatively more affordable. Dare to be bold…sums it up. There is also far more diversity between different regions of the USA and a much more interesting and entertaining history. You could never ever say American politics is boring.

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