Pitbulls…why?

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This topic contains 25 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  Unseen 4 years, 1 month ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 16 through 26 (of 26 total)
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  • #735

    Lars
    Participant

    @unseen why should an entire race of dogs have to pay, because some does not know how to keep ? Or why do they have to pay if there are only a “few” bad members of the race?

    #739

    Unseen
    Participant

    If I lived on and island with no children or elderly people, or even better if I lived completely alone, I might consider having a pitbull because they can be very loving and loyal as regards their owner. Unlike most other dogs (other fighting and guard breeds aside), if something goes wrong, it can go very long. You can easily find Youtube videos of a pitbull latching onto some other dog and not even his owner can get him to let go. This is a behavior that borders on instinct in pitbulls and related fighting breeds (Staffordshires, bullterriers, bulldogs, etc.). Guard dog breeds, too, can be unpredictable and can kill without warning and without anyone doing much to stop them apart from killing them.

    #741

    Unseen
    Participant

    @unseen why should an entire race of dogs have to pay, because some does not know how to keep ? Or why do they have to pay if there are only a “few” bad members of the race?

    They are a breed, not a race. A breed is a set of physical and behavioral characteristics. If you could breed the gameness and unpredictability of pitbulls out, I would be happy.

    I’m not trying to blame a breed, I’m trying to save some lives. Apparently, human lives are not valuable enough to justify the effort. At least in your eyes. Many of those saved would be small children, often in the dog’s family, or elderly citizens out for a leisurely walk. They are the typical victims.

    I suppose your solution is that the kids and elderly should wear armor?

    #742

    Lars
    Participant

    @unseen sorry your right about the terminologi.

    No you are not just trying to save lives, you are trying to save human lives on the expense of another animal’s life. I do not see humans as a special species, in comparison to an animal. I see us humans as just another animal, nothing special. And no I do not think that elderly nor children should wear armour.

    As I wrote, I suspect/theorise, that the problem with agression in most American pit bulls are due to inbreeding. As I have seen similiar problems in inbreed German Shepherds. I have seen a German Shepherds attack a child as well, I have seen it scar a man for life. But I have also seen them be some of the most loving dogs ever.

    #743

    Davis
    Participant

    @Lars. Pitbulls are not some natural Breed which evolved in nature they were bred by humans and would never have existed without us. They were bred some time ago for a purpose and there is no longer any good reason to keep them…especially considering the small but devastating risks involved (and this comes from a former owner who after a close call did everything to keep them tame). We arent supermen and cannot contol them 24 hours a day. They are not a breed which is so interconnected with the ecosystem to the point that their disappearance would change much of anything minus a few million squirrels. If, however, black bears were exterminated the loss would be immeasurable. The absence of pitbulls would not. In any case…we are over-pure-breeding dogs to the point that some breeds are full of genetic and physical problems. Creating new breeds and not focussing on $1000 dogs that are so called purebred should be the best thing for them and us.

    #744

    Unseen
    Participant

    No you are not just trying to save lives, you are trying to save human lives on the expense of another animal’s life. I do not see humans as a special species, in comparison to an animal. I see us humans as just another animal, nothing special. And no I do not think that elderly nor children should wear armour.

    As I wrote, I suspect/theorise, that the problem with agression in most American pit bulls are due to inbreeding. As I have seen similiar problems in inbreed German Shepherds. I have seen a German Shepherds attack a child as well, I have seen it scar a man for life. But I have also seen them be some of the most loving dogs ever.

    I’m not suggesting sending pitbulls to the slaughter. Rounding them up and running them through a gas chamber or wood chipper.

    As I said, what a breed is, is a set of physical and behavioral characteristics. I’m suggesting breeding those physical and behavior characteristics out of the species canis familiaris.

    We don’t need a dog that unpredictably decides to latch onto another being, be it another dog or a human, and refuse to let go until it has torn a part of that being off, and then will go back for more.

    Like I said, a pitbull is a breed of dog not a species. We can get rid of a breed and leave the species intact.

    Besides, and I haven’t mentioned this before, breeding to type has not been a good thing for canis familiaris. It has not improved the species as a species. It has simply pleased the whims of man. Canis familiaris as a species would be better off without humans wanting short snouts, short legs, a tendency to be scrappy, etc. None of that stuff was bred in to benefit the dog. And, BTW, breeding to type almost invariably breeds in defects as well. The purebred dogs have far more genetic diseases and defects than the everydog kind of dog of mixed heritage. Take a dog like the dingo. It is far more healthy than your average German shepherd, irish setter, boxer, pitbull, or sheepdog. So, yes, inbreeding is one part of the problem. Breeding to type is the other.

    #750

    Unseen
    Participant

    And I don’t want to hear about fining owners of pitbulls who attack. You can only do that after something terrible has already happened. Fat lot of good that does, besides adding money to the coffers of the state.

    #751

    Unseen
    Participant

    I could put up some images to show you what the result of a severe pitbull attack looks like, but it would definitely be NSFW, so I’ll just give you a google link. They probably are far worse than you expected. If you still think the real problem is the owner, you’ve drifted off into irrationality.

    Oh, sometimes they even kill their owners. I know of no other breed that does that.

    I know there are pitbull mixes. The idea is to get the pitbull geneology out of future mixes as much as possible.

    #752

    _Robert_
    Participant

    I was visiting friends who lived on a small farm. There were five dogs, three were small dogs, one looked like a Rottie mix, one was a German Shepard mix. Well, they were all friendly and playful with tails a-wagging. I played Frisbee fetch with them for a while. A little later on a huge hitched-up Draught horse accidentally bucked on top of this poor little pig that was snooting around under the horse. Well the pig squealed a terrible sound as it’s back broke and ALL five dogs INSTANTLY attacked that pig and began tearing it to pieces. All dogs are descendent from pack hunters and they can revert to hunt mode in a split second. Needless to say the smoker was full of pork the next day.

    #756

    Lars
    Participant

    @unseen

    As I said, what a breed is, is a set of physical and behavioral characteristics. I’m suggesting breeding those physical and behavior characteristics out of the species canis familiaris.

    Then I think we agree 🙂

    @davis most dog breeds today are, are the result of human interfering, in the breeding patterns. However I do understand your point.

    #764

    Unseen
    Participant

    No you are not just trying to save lives, you are trying to save human lives on the expense of another animal’s life.

    I’m more talking about keeping more pitbulls from being born than rounding them all up and killing them.

    We don’t need pitbulls. I haven’t heard from you or anyone else why we do.

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