Why not?

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This topic contains 7 replies, has 4 voices, and was last updated by  Unseen 7 months ago.

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  • #42729

    Unseen
    Participant

    Your life partner, brother, sister, best friend dies an untimely death.

    Suppose there was a highly-advanced technology or artifice by which you could have them back with you in person with all of their intellect and memories intact.

    Rather than asking “Would you do it?” I’m asking instead “Why not do it?”

    #42864

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    There’s no way to prove authenticity, or that the producer of the artifice or whatever is reliable or is a completely benevolent agent.

    #42866

    Autumn
    Participant

    For the sake of hypotheticals, I feel like you can usually presume it will work with benevolence not being important to the core consideration. Unless benevolence is intrinsically a concern with resurrection, it might not be central to the question. Similarly, I might have contextual concerns with such technology that it might become a gate kept perk of the wealthy with exorbitant fees and strings attached, but setting that aside, I have no objection to resurrection itself.

    In fiction there is often a taboo against resurrection apart from highly exceptional cases such as Gandalf or Jesus. But I feel that has more to do with keeping the stakes high as death is less of a concern if you can just pop right back. I feel it also clashes with a common human experience of learning to accept and cope with loss and our own mortality.

    But in real life? My dad died of pancreatic cancer. He wasn’t young, but at sixty-three he likely could have had many good years left. He could have met his granddaughter. He could have seen how things had turned out for me given he knew I was going to transition, but he never really got to see it happen. Maybe he could have chased his dream of retiring in Ecuador. There were conversations I had with him that I would never be able to have with anyone else, and in that sense, too, his absence has been felt. Provided he wanted to come back and he could come back cancer free, I’d revive him.

    I supposed the whole wanting to come back thing is tricky. How would we know? Some cases might be clearer than others. I guess my other presumption is that this whole affair isn’t potentially immortality. It would be some time before population control would be a grave issue, but if humans, in general, had unfettered access to revival technology, that might take some considerable adjustment.

    #42871

    Unseen
    Participant

    @autumn

    The fly in your ointment is that your dad wouldn’t be resurrected, he’d be recreated. It’s a problem similar to the Star Trek transporter problem, isn’t it? It would be like having your father back in a kind of “Feel-O-Vision” movie.

    How fair would it be to your recreated father? Presumably, the technology would be well-known to the world at large and one could hardly keep the matter of the death of your father from him (or if you could, it would raise different ethical issues).

    He’d know he’s a simulation, not the real thing.

    Right now, it’s an active topic in physics, “Are we living in a simulation?” For this recreated person, it would be more than idle discussion.

    • This reply was modified 7 months ago by  Unseen.
    • This reply was modified 7 months ago by  Unseen.
    #42875

    Autumn
    Participant

    In that case I’ve misinterpreted and the question doesn’t really interest me.

    #42877

    jakelafort
    Participant

    I just read how the life span of c. elegans has been extended 500 percent. It feels to me like we are on the verge of a medical revolution and when ya extrapolate the insertion of AI into the equation it is sci fi on our doorstep. Then again so is armageddon.

    #42883

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    It feels to me like we are on the verge of a medical revolution

    … and likely limited to the upper class, at least at first. Just like most new tech necessarily (in capitalism) begins with expensive prototyping.

    Religions have simply resolved this debate, by the way. We’ll all rejoin our families, eventually, unless we end up in opposing venues or don’t share simultaneity in purgatory.

    #42884

    Unseen
    Participant

    In that case I’ve misinterpreted and the question doesn’t really interest me.

    Well, that is only one approach to it.

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