Music Origins, History, Creation, Special Musicians…

Homepage Forums Small Talk Music Origins, History, Creation, Special Musicians…

This topic contains 89 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  PopeBeanie 1 month ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 76 through 90 (of 90 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #52258

    Unseen
    Participant

    So, I ran into this performer who has one answer to the question, “How does a violinist prosper in the world of rock?” Meet Lindsey Stirling, who I assumed was British for some reason. Turns out, she’s as American as apple pie and cheeseburgers.

    Another, slicker, pro video:

    #52266

    Don’t mess with John Wick even when he only has a pencil in his hand.

    #52272

    Unseen
    Participant

    Don’t mess with John Wick even when he only has a pencil in his hand.

    He’s killed many people with his bare hands.

    #52278

    Unseen
    Participant

    Can a 10 year old girl who’s probably too small to get on the roller coaster sing a blues/jazz standard sounding like a 40 year old? Why, yes, Virginia. IF she’s Angelina Jordan:

    A reaction and analysis by opera singer Elizabeth Zharoff (aka The Charismatic Voice):

    And now here she is looking a lot like Amy Winehouse (minus the tattoos and over-the-top eye makeup) showing she’s still got a singing voice:

    BTW, in case you’re wondering what’s behind her exotic looks, her mom is 50/50 Japanese/Iranian and her dad is Swedish.

    #52288

    Unseen
    Participant

    A few decades ago, I used to do a 45 minute evening health walk and back then there were Walkman-style players that could play CDs. One of my favorite CD’s to listen to was Nine Inch Nails’ Pretty Hate Machine which didn’t have a filler track on it. Terrible Lie, though, was  one of my favorites. Here, Opera Singer Elizabeth Zharoff analyzes a live performance of Terrible Lie.

    She, like several other opera singers and voice coaches is gaining an appreciation of popular music, especially rock and more especially the more extreme forms of it, hard metal and industrial rock, etc. In fact, one of her favorite bands is AC/DC!

    BTW, I took a friend close to my age to a NIN concert and she was very self conscious over the fact that in the audience consisting mostly of late teens and twenties, we, both in our 4o’s, were the two oldest people there.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  Unseen.
    #52292

    _Robert_
    Participant

    Love NIN. Saw them a few times.

    She is like “doesn’t sound like he is a super-rangy singer”. Yeah, that’s what a good industrial song needs is someone going from C2 to C6, LOL.

    She could take a look at The Cocteau Twins who actually might be played by the same DJ that just played NIN. Now she can hit C6.

     

     

    #52303

    Unseen
    Participant

    Is the quest for perfection actually the enemy of perfection?

    Technology is killing music. Music is or should be a human activity. Today, Autotune and other tools can make music pretty close to absolutely perfect, which people are not.

    Years ago and before Autotune came along, the singer Curtis Salgado said in an interview something like this (I’m forced to paraphrase) “If the singer is going for it and his voice cracks, so what? I’d rather he sing his ass of than play it safe.”

    Are we heading toward singing robots in the semi-near future?

    The Wings of Pegasus commentator’s take:

    #52307

    _Robert_
    Participant

    Autotune is not the issue for me. The issue is that all of these songs that are the same 4 chords and rhythm in pop music. In the days of album rock, a band could make the charts with a song that had 6 parts, a key change, a timing shift and even a drum solo. Instrumental songs could make the charts. I don’t know why that all ended. It’s still out there, I guess but it’s buried away from the masses. Now music seems to be micro-categorized and formulaic. There should be much freedom within the categories. There is plenty of raw talent, so maybe it’s on the music consumer.

    #52311

    Unseen
    Participant

    @ Robert

    According to Rick Beato, it’s about business, the consolidation of radio stations under just several corporate umbrellas, and placing business efficiency over the discovery and cultivation of talented artists.

    #52312

    _Robert_
    Participant

    Well that all adds up. In my youth most of us did have shared experiences through rock/pop music. Seeing a favorite band on late night TV was an event.

    #52313

    Unseen
    Participant

    When I was in college in the late 60’s and early 70’s, that was the heyday of “album rock” when the radios shifted from playing 2.5-3 minute pop tunes to recordings of just about any length. DJ’s were local celebrities and in some cases even nationally, such as “Wolfman” Jack.

    Then, the big corporations started buying up the local stations and started doing what capitalists do. They reorganized the whole thing with profits in mind, so instead of local programming directors, that function was done from some central office in L.A. or New York. And they figured out that local talk radio could make a lot of money for them, especially if they talked about politics and/or sports.

    And music radio was dead. Then the Walkman came along and people started buying the music they liked, which was yet another nail in the coffin of music radio.

    • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  Unseen.
    #52323

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    And music radio was dead. Then the Walkman came along and people started buying the music they liked, which was yet another nail in the coffin of music radio.

    A lot to catch up on in this thread, but this, first. There are some internet “music radio stations” I really like, which all happen to be non-profit.


    KRCW – Livestreams: Eclectic 24 (my favorite); KCRW Live; NPR News stream (usually from BBC). Scroll down their page for other shows, mostly recorded.
    Playlists show what’s playing and what has played recently.
    About: Los Angeles based, with other non-profit Southern California affiliations.
    They used to have a KCRW – Berlin, Germany presence, which I liked listening to online, but it shut down end of 2020.


    RadioParadise.com Four live channels to choose from, each with viewable playlist history. Optionally display a set of often impressive photos or art for each song, song/band info, or listener comments. Carl’s Jr (fast food) restaurants in my area play it, but it’s NOT cheesy! It’s listener supported, and well curated IMO. You can see a page of info for each song, and rate any song to add to a Favorites playlist, even after the song is finished playing. (Minimum 100 songs.) Choose from five audio quality settings. I’m very impressed by everything about RP. No ads!
    About: Started and run by a music loving family. Based in Eureka after moving from Paradise, towns in Northern California.
    screenclip of radioparadise playlist


    I like Minnesota Public Radio (MPR), “The Current” in particular is my go-to. Three genre channels. I haven’t tried the second channel “Carbon Sound”, and the third channel “Radio Heartland” is more local-music and Country oriented. (Minneapolis has had its own music scene for decades.)
    Has playlist history, like the stations above.

    #52325

    Unseen
    Participant

    @ PopeBeanie

    You can listen to whatever kind of rock you want to hear all day long on Youtube without being exposed to anything new, which I’m sure a lot of people do.

    Are you familiar with SomaFM.com? It’s a site with a couple dozen channels devoted to various genres and themes. There also apps for playing SomaFM on one’s phone and you can also cast it to your TV or some stereo systems with a device like the Google Chromcast.

    Then, there are rock and roll stations on Youtube as well, such as…

    #52375

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    I guess I’m not into Classic Rock as a solitary genre. especially when it’s programmed as a canned, “Best Classic Rock Of All Time” list of 100 at a time. I’m sure it’s fine for a lot of people, and any suggestions you and I make are probably helpful for a wide range of people. I do see several of their other sets-of-100 lists. Click once, and it repeats the same 100 for the next 24 hours if you let it, but with no info on each song, not even its name. (But I tried it!)

    I like the eclectic streams I mentioned where I can hear something new most of the time. And I like Radio Paradise (RP) for a similar reason, while some classics or under-rated album B tracks are mixed in, and not just from one genre. Listeners can skip songs, score them for an automatic, customized but optional playlist, and I sometimes like reading song or band background info, and comments from previous listeners from as long ago as 21 years. I feel lucky that others like RP enough to contribute $ to it to keep it free for people like me.

    It may also be a matter of principle for me now, not liking the suggestions that YouTube steers me into clicking on. It seems like I appreciate something like only 1% to 5% of their suggestions at this point. So I’m appreciating other sources that don’t exist just to get us to keep clicking and follow their rabbit holes. I’m paying for YT monthly to get around the atrocious number and irrelevance of ads, so YT usually works best for me when I know exactly what I’m looking for, although at times their searches aren’t sophisticated enough to let me filter out huge bunches of crap.

    SomaFM, I haven’t looked at it for so long, it looks pretty different now. Thanks, I’ll try it again!

     

    #52376

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    Wisdom. Only 45 seconds.

Viewing 15 posts - 76 through 90 (of 90 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.