Sunday School

Sunday School May 3rd 2020

This topic contains 16 replies, has 5 voices, and was last updated by  Simon Paynton 2 months ago.

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  • #31459

    Simon Paynton
    Participant

    define these terms and provide examples to back up these claims.

    I can’t provide examples of things that haven’t happened.  It would be easier for you to give positive examples of when academic philosophers have answered the question, “how should we live?”.

    #31483

    Simon Paynton
    Participant

    Here is a modern philosopher who engages with the question, “how should we live” – or at least, makes a discussion about the discussion about it.  He bewails how modern philosophy limits itself to boring nonsense (from “Modern Moral Philosophy”):

    The task of moral philosophy was not to teach moral truths or to instruct one how to live, but rather to clarify the “logic of moral concepts” or “the nature of moral discourse.” Moral philosophy was not about what people ought to do; it was about “what they are doing when they talk about what they ought to do” (Hudson, 1970: 1). But there was a price to be paid for this change in the conception of moral philosophy. Substantive moral questions ceased to be either asked or answered; they appeared only by courtesy, as illustrations, and were held away at arm’s length. Moral philosophy gave the impression that “all the important issues <were> off the page somewhere” and had managed to find “an original way of being boring which <was> by not discussing moral issues at all” (Williams, 1972: 9-10; also Wilson, 1961: 1ff.).

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