Trump setting America on fire

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This topic contains 60 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  PopeBeanie 1 week, 5 days ago.

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  • #34437

    jakelafort
    Participant

    Glen, Glenie..oh that is horrible! I’ve been Glengod, Glenner, Glenrod but fortunately never Glennie. I was not aware of the Gaelic Glen.

    #34438

    Glen D
    Participant

     

    @jakelafort

    ” I was not aware of the Gaelic Glen.”

    It’s actually a generic  gaelic suffix  “een” .  It means ‘little’ or is used  as term of endearment.   It can also be used as a pejorative.

    Pretty sure ‘Glen’ is not a gaelic name, but comes from the Irish and Scottish gaelic;  ‘gleann’ , a small mountain valley.

     

     

    #34440

    jakelafort
    Participant

    Thanks for the information, Glen.

    #34444

    Unseen
    Participant

    @jakelafort ” I was not aware of the Gaelic Glen.” It’s actually a generic gaelic suffix “een” . It means ‘little’ or is used as term of endearment. It can also be used as a pejorative. Pretty sure ‘Glen’ is not a gaelic name, but comes from the Irish and Scottish gaelic; ‘gleann’ , a small mountain valley.

    Why can’t it be both a personal name and a name for a something? After all, Tom can be a person or a male turkey, and like Glen, the name Dale also means “valley” (“over hill and dale”).

    #34445

    Glen D
    Participant

    @unseen

    “Why can’t it be both a personal name and a name for a something?”

    I don’t remember saying it cannot. I simply pointed out that  “Glen” is not a gaelic name. However, in  non gaelic speaking Australia   it is mainly used as a name. The use of  ‘glen’ as a geographic feature is rarely heard.   Perhaps seen as  a little archaic , even flowery today.—–Australians tend to call a spade a f—- shovel. We are not widely known for our flowery speech.

    ———————————————————————————————————————–

    Australian English as it is spoke.

    Lesson 1; Always remember that the ‘l’ in ‘Australia’ is silent.

    #34446

    Unseen
    Participant

    @unseen “Why can’t it be both a personal name and a name for a something?” I don’t remember saying it cannot. I simply pointed out that “Glen” is not a gaelic name. However, in non gaelic speaking Australia it is mainly used as a name. The use of ‘glen’ as a geographic feature is rarely heard. Perhaps seen as a little archaic , even flowery today.—–Australians tend to call a spade a f—- shovel. We are not widely known for our flowery speech. ———————————————————————————————————————– Australian English as it is spoke. Lesson 1; Always remember that the ‘l’ in ‘Australia’ is silent.

    “Oh Johnny Boy, the pipes the pipes are calling/From glen to glen, and down the mountainside”

    #34457

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    Dan Dennett had a few good Redneck quotes here. The whole video is worth a viewing.

    I’ve seen it. Much enjoyed it again, thank you!

    Unseen (and others), the comment about the military being diverse was true and a pleasant surprise when I served. I’m sure it’s even better now with more women, albeit with problems that still need to be worked out.

    When I mentioned Trollump’s firing of Secretary of Defense Esper, I felt he wouldn’t actually be able to get the military to support him staying in the WH. And the Secret Service is who he’d have to deal with if he were to actually resist moving out. I’m sure it’s just an act for the benefit of his loyal Cult45 minions, and to perpetuate whatever kind of reality show(s) he’s hoping to star in next.

    Meanwhile, some of the more militant of Cult45-like militias could feel encouraged to plan worse things.

     

    #34458

    Glen D
    Participant

    “Oh Johnny Boy, the pipes the pipes are calling/From glen to glen, and down the mountainside”

    LMAO

    First, it’s “Danny Boy”. T’was my father’s favourite song. Dad had a fine lyric tenor voice and would sing it at parties when he was oiled.

    A perfect  example of the word being archaic in describing a geographic feature:

    Strictly speaking, is only part Irish ,having been written by an English songwriter in 1913. It is set to a traditional Irish tune,  “The Londonderry Air” .

    AM I right in thinking you do not have the great  good fortune to be of Irish descent?

    Below the full lyrics. Below that the song sung as it should be,  by a top Irish tenor with plenty of schmaltz.

    “Oh, Danny boy, the pipes, the pipes are calling
    From glen to glen, and down the mountain side.
    The summer’s gone, and all the roses falling,
    It’s you, It’s you must go and I must bide.
    But come ye back when summer’s in the meadow,
    Or when the valley’s hushed and white with snow,
    It’s I’ll be here in sunshine or in shadow,—
    Oh, Danny boy, O Danny boy, I love you so!

    But when ye come, and all the flowers are dying,
    If I am dead, as dead I well may be,
    Ye’ll come and find the place where I am lying,
    And kneel and say an Avè there for me.
    And I shall hear, though soft you tread above me,
    And all my grave will warmer, sweeter be,
    For you will bend and tell me that you love me,
    And I shall sleep in peace until you come to me!”

     

    • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by  Glen D.
    #34461

    Unseen
    Participant

    And the Secret Service is who he’d have to deal with if he were to actually resist moving out.

    I’m sure the Secret Service will be glad to roll him up in a carpet and carry him to the NY State Attorney General’s office door.

    #34463

    Unseen
    Participant

    Glen, on most days I know that it’s “Danny boy” not “Johnny boy.” Senior moment, perhaps.

    #34464

    Kristina
    Participant

    But is it the Londonderry Air or the London Derriere?

    #34465

    Glen D
    Participant

    “Glen, on most days I know that it’s “Danny boy” not “Johnny boy.” Senior moment, perhaps.”

    I empathise. Only recently I’ve discovered how unforgiving a PC can be when I have such a moment

    @ Kristina

    “But is it the Londonderry Air or the London Derriere?”

    That depends on whether one is on the way to, or on the way from the pub and half a dozen pints of Guinness.

    #34468

    Unseen
    Participant

    “Glen, on most days I know that it’s “Danny boy” not “Johnny boy.” Senior moment, perhaps.” I empathise. Only recently I’ve discovered how unforgiving a PC can be when I have such a moment @ Kristina “But is it the Londonderry Air or the London Derriere?” That depends on whether one is on the way to, or on the way from the pub and half a dozen pints of Guinness.

    And didn’t Jimi Hendrix say, “Excuse me, while I kiss this guy”?

    #34475

    Glen D
    Participant

    @ Unseen

    “And didn’t Jimi Hendrix say, “Excuse me, while I kiss this guy”?”

    Close enough.

    This bloke seems to have it sewn up.

     

     

     

     

    #34481

    Unseen
    Participant

    Is he Australian? Some British accents are difficult enough for Americans to understand, but a heavy Aussie accent might as well be a foreign language to some of us, and I’m one. I couldn’t clearly hear the words of the singer, either so I gave up about a minute in. Sorry.

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