Unseen

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  • #44122

    Unseen
    Participant

    @Enco

    Your ignorance about prostitution overflows into your ignorance about apps and websites. Some of these resources have been online for a decade or longer. There are even sites offering reviews of the girls (well, mostly girls) and the quality of their services. You can even hook up on Facebook though Snapchat is far safer.

    And while Backpage is gone, the concept lives in the form of YesBackpage.

    The biggest risk is that of being scammed or rolled, but I can be scammed on a used car lot or rolled walking from my apartment to the nearby convenience store.

    • This reply was modified 1 day, 6 hours ago by  Unseen.
    #44117

    Unseen
    Participant

    @Enco

    Your ignorance of mid-level and high-end prostitution is profound. I’m guessing you get it from TV. You are talking about street walker prostitutes probably run by pimps. That is so old school. It exists, but it isn’t what I was describing.

    There are ways to connect with a person who is willing to perform sexual services in almost perfect secrecy. There are apps and websites for that and the place can be the seller’s or buyer’s, not a dingy filthy back alley.

    The authorities in most places really mostly want to stamp out the street walker who loiters on street corners waiting for a car to stop or the indentured slave kind of prostitute working in “massage” parlors. One reason for concentrating on them is that they are fairly visible to the public and create cultural sinks or strips crawling with lowlifes. Another reason: they are low-hanging fruit, easy to catch.

    #44109

    Unseen
    Participant

    @Enco

    The main cause of Venezuela’s economic problems isn’t socialism, it’s capitalist interference by The United States.

    What makes prices go up? Well, capitalism is right: Prices go up when there are shortages, when there isn’t enough of something to go around. It’s called the law of supply and demand. And one thing which has become artificially scarce for Venezuela is trade through sanctions engineered by the United States. The U.S. gets oil from the other side of the world, The Middle East, rather than from Venezuela, which is nearby. That makes no economic sense unless you want to force Venezuela to fail. The U.S. is also less than friendly to countries who do business with Venezuela.

    Until the U.S. takes its hands off the throat of Venezuela, we can’t accurately judge Venezuela’s success.

    #44108

    Unseen
    Participant

    But that shouldn’t equate to using non-combatants as sacrificial pawns or a total callous indifference to collateral civilian casualties.

    Having any rules of war is meaningless if non-combatants are disposable. If you can pick off civilians as part of some other strategic aim, then why not just bomb a school for some aim or mustard gas people for some aim or drop a second nuclear bomb on a city for some other aim (or suicide blow up a bus for some aim). No strategic interests of the nation I live in are worth justifying slaughtering civilians in another country. That’s just sociopathy.

    It needn’t involve noncombatants. For example, in the Soviet-Afghan War, the Taliban would behead captured Russian soldiers. News of this circumstance reaching the Russian public helped Russia decide to cut and run.

    Lately, Ukraine mistreats Russian prisoners, shooting captured and bound soldiers in the leg and more recently castrating a captured Russian. Perhaps they’re taking a page from the Taliban’s success in Afghanistan.

    I know Russians mistreat prisoners as well.

    #44101

    Unseen
    Participant

    “My people, I’m sorry to inform you that we have surrendered to our enemy. We had no choice. We could have won but it would have involved committing war crimes and as you know, keeping our hands clean and cleaving to the moral high ground is more important than evading the plunder and enslavement of losing.”

    Would we want a leader who would let us lose to an oppressor rather than engage in actions forbidden by international law?

    #44099

    Unseen
    Participant

    @jake

    I don’t think there are any credible sex robots but there definitely are highly realistic sex dolls with mouths, vaginas, and anuses functional enough to be used.

    Of course, why buy a sex doll or bot when warm-blooded sex is available from willing sex workers? Given the high cost of education in the U.S., there are attractive college girls working their way through their education by doing sex work a few hours every week, which pays much better than flipping burgers or dispensing espresso, leaving more time for studying.

    Some girls even adopt sugar daddies, well to do men who will provide them with an apartment and a basic income in exchange for an agreed upon hours per week providing services. The smarter girls adopt more than one sugar daddy and arrange their schedules so the daddies never run into each other. This can result in very high income. In which case, why bother with college? A high end escort is born,

    Were you so inclined (I’ll give you that out) would you rather enjoy yourself with an inanimate object or a cooperative attractive girl 18-25?

    Here is an example sex doll:

    • This reply was modified 3 days, 7 hours ago by  Unseen.
    #44095

    Unseen
    Participant

    Holy cock balls! Was that vid for real? Was that an actress or an android? I gotta listen again cuz the ponies were diverting my attention. The definition given early in the vid about consciousness makes sense to me.

    “She” was a robot. The human face has many muscles that can result in numerous microepressions. This robot is only capable of the main expressions but not microexpressions. How many times did she furrow her forehead? raise just one side of her mouth?

    There is nothing complex about her expressions. She seems physically attractive but there’s nothing interesting about her. She’d make a boring date.

    #44075

    Unseen
    Participant

    I’ll make this contribution to Sunday School this week. It’s from Organic Intelligence Has No Long-Term Future by Sir Martin Rees, Astronomer Royal.

    We’re now witnessing the early stages of this transition. It’s not hard to envisage a “hyper computer” achieving oracular powers that could offer its controller dominance of international finance and strategy—this seems only a quantitative (not qualitative) step beyond what “quant” hedge funds do today. Sensor technologies still lag behind human capacities. But when robots can observe and interpret their environment as adeptly as we do they would truly be perceived as intelligent beings, to which (or to whom) we can relate, at least in some respects, as we to other people. We’d have no more reason to disparage them as zombies than to regard other people in that way.

    Their greater processing speed may give robots an advantage over us. But will they remain docile rather than “going rogue”? And what if a hyper-computer developed a mind of its own? If it could infiltrate the Internet—and the Internet of things—it could manipulate the rest of the world. It may have goals utterly orthogonal to human wishes—or even treat humans as an encumbrance. Or (to be more optimistic) humans may transcend biology by merging with computers, maybe subsuming their individuality into a common consciousness. In old-style spiritualist parlance, they would “go over to the other side.”

    The horizons of technological forecasting rarely extend even a few centuries into the future—and some predict transformational changes within a few decades. But the Earth has billions of years ahead of it, and the cosmos a longer (perhaps infinite) future. So what about the posthuman era—stretching billions of years ahead?

    There are chemical and metabolic limits to the size and processing power of “wet” organic brains. Maybe we’re close to these already. But no such limits constrain silicon-based computers (still less, perhaps, quantum computers): for these, the potential for further development could be as dramatic as the evolution from monocellular organisms to humans.

    #44072

    Unseen
    Participant

    The very first article in The Nation fails to load for me in two different browsers. The Nation’s main page loads but not that article.

    Am I alone?

    #44071

    Unseen
    Participant

    @jake

    Yes, people rebel against the feeling they are being forced or corralled into doing something. It’s all about perception..

    #44063

    Unseen
    Participant

    It seems like obesity is a risk factor for every damn illness or disease. 90 years old and fat? Idk but every single time i see a pic of a 100 yr old it is a skinny mini person. If USA socializes medicine and it should maybe we can have incentives relating to weight. Obesity is directly related to our ridiculous health care bill. So it might be a net positive to have financial incentives. Also it might ease the burden on health care workers a bit if it was the impetus to lose/maintain weight.

    America has an allergy to social engineering. If you try to force people to do one thing, they will ignore you or do the opposite in order to exert their autonomy.

    #44059

    Unseen
    Participant

    Unseen, If individuals do not have the competence to make the most elementary decision of which medicine they want and at what quantity and price, or to do their due diligence on hospitals and physicians in advance to getting sick, then by what stretch of the imagination do individuals who call themselves Government have the competence to run a nation’s entire health care system?

    What’s good about the current system whereby health care is based on profit for the dispensers of it rather than delivering the best possible outcomes on average.

    (Remember, this is the same Government that subsidized tobacco, starch, and sugar, that hoarded PPE on the basis of a lie, and forced COVID-19 patients in with healthy convalescent elderly and made the latter die, and that kept cheap COVID-19 tests and vaccines off the market, all throughout the COVID-19 crisis and still does to this day.)

    If anything sucks worse than the U.S. Federal Government it’s the U.S. Health Care System.

    In fact, a lot of what sucks about the U.S. Health Care System is DUE to a government that blocks positive change at every turn. Blockages designed to help maintain and enhance the profits made by an inefficient system.

    So, what I’m saying is that, yes, the government (by which I mean OUR government) would be terrible at running a national health care system, so what’s needed is a system run under the Hippocratic Oath* with the government WAY in the background. As it is now, doctors are burdened with paperwork, some necessitated by the government and some required by the private medical insurance companies.

    * I’d like to see the Hippocratic Oath codified into laws with teeth such that failing to deliver care to the detriment of a patient incurs a legal liability.

    You see, the government is not the entirety of the problem, it’s the middleman part of the industry, an entire category of the business which can largely be eliminated along with the money we spend to feed their bureaucracy, a bureaucracy largely designed to deny the payment of claims, no matter how valid the reason. The insurance companies drive up medical costs by denying claims. If the insurer won’t pay and the patient can’t, the doctor or hospital has to pay a good deal of this expense to those who can pay.

    Also, the fact that nothing has 100 percent market share is why marketing is considered work, and it is evidence that consumers can always say “no.”

    Say no based on what? Crystal balls are very expensive nowadays.

    #44058

    Unseen
    Participant

    Hmm, Ukraine’s military is supposed to just walk away and give up their cities to Russian war criminals (and now North Koreans too)? Nope. How stupid. Russia opened this war by rocketing and bombing their capital city full of civilians. Civilians are in the fight. I watched a video of an old man hunting down hapless Russian armored vehicles with an RPG. And then we have video of Russians castrating a POW. Would anybody want to surrender to them now? https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2022/07/ukraine-russian-soldiers-filmed-viciously-attacking-ukrainian-pow-must-face-justice/

    In the yes/no context, I’m putting you in the “War crimes are sometimes OK” column.

    #44047

    Unseen
    Participant

    Unseen, When I need medical help I can almost never do what would be called intelligent and effective price shopping be it for doctors, medications, emergency services, whatever.

    That’s because the law forbids Physicians, Pharmacists, Clinical, and Hospitals from posting prices for their procedures and wares. The only medical devices I’ve seen freely advertised with prices are eyeglasses and hearing aids. In a Free-Market health care system, those laws wouldn’t exist and you could know who offers what for how much as easy as a menu screen on location at the practice or pharmacy or via an app from the practice or pharmacy to save you a trip.

    Much of the time, even with the information available, an intelligent choice would still be largely impossible due to several factors including the urgency of making a quick decision and the lawyerly and psychologically massaged presentation of the facts designed to help me make the decision THEY want rather than the best decision.

    I just did, both here and the previous post. And there’s more that can be done to make health care better by deregulation and de-control.

    When you remove deregulation and control, you are handing the medical system over to the marketing department who can feed you what they think will make the sale while withholding important info you probably should know.

    And then, I say once again, you don’t have the time and information handy to make a good choice. I had a heart attack and the EMT’s asked me which ER I’d prefer. How the fuck do I know? If I want to buy a car, I can spend hours, days, weeks, even months gathering info, making comparisons, looking for bargains. On a gurney, which ER to go to was perplexing. I ended up taking the nearest one even though, perhaps, another one a mile further away might have the best facilities.

    #44045

    Unseen
    Participant

    @Enco

    Here’s why we need government to help protect us from the “free market” for pharmaceuticals. This is Pfizer in Great Britain but you can bet the same sort of shenanigans go on here. One hopes that the legislation allowing Medicare to negotiate drug prices will pass.

    Dr. Campbell is a dependable and independent expert. A visit to his channel to peruse past videos would be time well spent.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 2,847 total)