Unseen

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  • #28429

    Unseen
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    Here is an interesting fact about trade between China and America which could potentially have dire consequences if a trade war were to escalate. It puts China in a very powerful position. America imports 97% of its antibiotics from China. What if China were to double the prices? What if China were to stop exporting them? This is where Trump should be insisting that they are manufactured within the USA. Reliance on China could be seen as a foreign threat and lack of home production could be deemed a domestic threat to national security. Who has out sourced all production to China? Why not manufacture in pharmaceutical hubs like Chicago or San Francisco?

    If China were to simply stop shipping stuff to the US entirely for a month, we’d realize the truth: that China and the US basically share an economy. If either one hurts the other, both suffer.

    #28420

    Unseen
    Participant

    I’ll never forget the day my teenage daughter told me “I don’t like jazz.” I laughed and said, “You haven’t heard enough jazz to even begin to say that.” I don’t think she’s changed her mind, but that’s because her taste in music doesn’t go far beyond pop and country. I’m a failure as a parent.

    But to anyone wanting to know if there’s any jazz they might like, I would direct them to this 1966 recording by Chico Hamilton’s group.

    Perhaps requiring a bit more sensitivity is Dexter Gordon’s rendition of You’ve Changed…

    I’m sure one of the first exercises a young saxophonist has to do is run through some arpeggios, notes in a scale. Well, Dexter opens this piece with some arpeggios, but when played by a master…well, there’s a big difference.

    • This reply was modified 2 days, 17 hours ago by  Unseen.
    • This reply was modified 2 days, 17 hours ago by  Unseen.
    #28418

    Unseen
    Participant

    My taste in music is very broad. Broad enough to include classical music. This piece is kind of jaw-dropping. Bach transcribed a Vivaldi concerto for four violins and orchestra, making a concerto for four harpsichords and orchestra. Now, I don’t know where you live, but consider the difficulty of just finding four harpsichords to bring together at the same time and place. If I owned one, it’d never leave my home. I’m pretty sure that here in Portland, gathering four instruments would be a practical impossibility. More likely cities like New York, London, Paris, Amsterdam, or Berlin. It’s not like most of us have gone into someone’s home and seen a harpsichord the way we might see a piano or guitar. And any  symphony orchestra is going to have at least one (and probably two or more) pianos on hand, but not a harpsichord unless they perform a lot of baroque music.

    Unlike the piano forte, whose name translates as “soft loud,” and responds proportionally to the energy applied by the player, the harpsichord has no dynamic range at all. Despite that disadvantage, the harpsichord has a certain kind of brittle, fragile beauty that the piano can’t approach.

    Enjoy…

    • This reply was modified 2 days, 18 hours ago by  Unseen.
    #28406

    Unseen
    Participant

    If this happens over and over again, get back to us. Otherwise, I’ll just invoke coincidence. Sounds like a psychological close relative of deja vu.

    Of course, if it happens over and over again, there may be a business opportunity in there somewhere.

    #28394

    Unseen
    Participant

    It was Lonnie Mack’s songs Memphis and Wham that got me to pick up an electric guitar and start playing.

    The thing is, neither of those instrumentals showed of his best guitar playing, which is instantly recognizable oncce you’ve heard a couple of his songs. And neither showed of his wonderful voice, either. He’s gone now. What a loss.

    Here he is with two other guitar legends, Albert Collins and Roy Buchanan. He always (when electric) played a Gibson Flying-V with Bigsby Vibrato attached through a feat of engineering. LOL And his sound is largely do to his pioneering use of a Leslie speaker. “The Leslie speaker is a combined amplifier and loudspeaker that projects the signal from an electric or electronic instrument and modifies the sound by rotating a baffle chamber in front of the loudspeakers. A similar effect is provided by a rotating system of horns in front of the treble driver.” This sort of speaker gives the characteristic vibrato we all hear when we hear a performer on a Hammond B-3 electronic organ.

    Finally, a classic instrumental done in the tradition of country guitar “chicken pickin’,” from which the tune gets its name.

    Like that other obscure guitar hero, Danny Gatton, Lonnie always had the “What is he?” problem, though not nearly as bad as Gatton. Was he rock? country? blues? gospel? He even wrote a song title “Too Rock for Country, Too Country for Rock and Roll.” Most people appreciate one genre and don’t want to hear anything else.

    He fell into relative obscurity for a couple decades until rediscovered by Stevie Ray Vaughan, but with Vaughan’s death and the consequential lack of support from the mega-star, he sank back into obscurity again, playing small clubs here and there with audiences consisting largely of guitarists. He was a classic musician’s musician, loved by musicians but largely unknown to the general public, save for a couple hits from the sixties.

    Oh, heck, I’ll throw in one last instrumental. It’s a later instrumental and is about the most muscular electric guitar playing I can think of in the blues genre.

    #28380

    Unseen
    Participant

    What nobody has said but it  is evident to me, at least nobody i have read or heard, is that for trump (and perhaps many of his followers) it is about DOMINANCE. Don’t placate a bully. Go for his nuts.

    When they go low, we go and piss on them.

    I fear that the debates have or are becoming largely irrelevant.

    #28379

    Unseen
    Participant

    There is no way 1st aid kit are from Sweden, LOL

    Sweden is one of the homes of pop music! They have a knack for it.

    ABBA? You can’t get much more pop than that.

    #28375

    Unseen
    Participant

    Unseen you implied debate. But if he does not appear for debates you call him a coward. You take every opportunity to discuss the way he has conducted himself. You question his competence, his intelligence and his integrity. You say he is afraid to face you. You ask the public whether they are comfortable voting for an incumbent who is either too frightened to appear for a debate or has become so similar to the dictators he admires and befriends that he considers himself above the requirements of democracy. Yeah he is good at branding. But it is the stuff ten years olds do. Lion Ted and other childish monikers. I would avoid that.

    Trump gets away with stonewalling Congress daily. I don’t see saying he has more important things to do than debate like being President (=playing golf, =tweeting) as in any way fatal. When he actually showed up to debate Clinton, he didn’t really debate her. He just did his thing. Rational people thought/knew that she won by every objective standard.

    It’s dangerous to apply objective standards to El Presidente.

    #28371

    Unseen
    Participant

    Man alive, Unseen, i cant understand why you think Trump is a tough guy to oppose. On the contrary i can’t imagine an easier opponent. If you as a candidate can not eviscerate him, leave him in a puddle of sweat, vomit and piss while he ignominiously grabs his crotch for emotional support, then you as a candidate suck! Get down in the dirt and exchange insults…attack his record…engage him intellectually in any topic. I doubt there is anything he can debate intelligently.

    Underestimating Trump won him the 2016 election. The only chance they’ll get to even face him will be in debates, but he’s not above saying he doesn’t need to debate. He’s become expert at being noncooperative and it’s benefited him. He may simply go to rallies on debate day, if debates are even scheduled.

    Then, the single one thing he’s good at (the one honest thing) is branding. When he derisively brands the candidate, do they try to brand him back or laugh it off and ignore it? Derision is a very powerful weapon. Or do they do worse? “When they go low, we go and PISS on them.”

    #28342

    Unseen
    Participant

    I can’t imagine most of the Dem candidates standing up to Putin or Trump, and that includes cuties like Butigieg and O’Rourke. I also don’t see Biden as a strong candidate. He’s lost any edge he once had, mentally. I can imagine Sanders, Warren, or Yang in that position.

    Yang I like because, unlike Sanders and Warren, he recognizes that the biggest problem American workers have that’s costing them jobs is automation, not cheap foreign labor. Bring those jobs back to the US, and disproportionately those jobs will be lost due to various efficiencies, with automation leading the way.

    Two candidates which didn’t make it to the last debate would also be a handful for both Trump and Putin: Tulsi Gabbard and Tom Steyer. Gabbard is military, which would give her wide appeal, and she has proven fearless in attacking the ‘military industrial complex,” which is probably why the mainstream Dem party is standing on its head to keep her from receiving any public exposure, so she’s been limited to doing small town halls snd the very occasional 10 minute TV appearance.

    Steyer has a long history as a liberal despite being a successful capitalist. He’s spending his own money. He could expose Trump for what a business fraud he is, with whatever success he has enjoyed being as the result of cheating, defrauding, flim-flams, and his undeniable talent for branding.

    But I don’t care who the Dems nominate. They will have my vote as long as Trump is the GOP nominee. I just wish they would nominate someone strong.

    It’s time to overthrow the Old Schoolers who currently control the party and make it hard for the Bernies, Warrens, Gabbards, and Steyers from being seriously considered.

    BTW, folks. Here’s a reminder if you support Bernie, Warren, or Gabbard: If you support a candidate who has sworn off corporate donations, guess who they have to get the campaign money from…I support Tulsi, and so far I’ve given her over $150 in small $10-$25 donations.

    • This reply was modified 6 days, 5 hours ago by  Unseen.
    • This reply was modified 6 days, 5 hours ago by  Unseen.
    • This reply was modified 6 days, 4 hours ago by  Unseen.
    #28325

    Unseen
    Participant

    @jake Not talking about his hair. Lol But he can’t seem to keep his ideas together when speaking, he repeats himself a lot…I just worry this will cause voters to stop paying attention. I love Bernie, don’t get me wrong. He’s just coming across tired, and who can blame him? We are all.

    I’m pretty sure I’d look far more tired traveling from town to town everyday giving essentially the same talk at every stop. I’m not worried about Bernie’s energy level. He’s just not being candid (I won’t say honest) about the chance of him implementing his health care plan as described even with a Democrat-majority Senate. Ditto for Warren. Yet, I’d vote for either one. I would expect something better than what we have now.

    • This reply was modified 1 week ago by  Unseen.
    #28324

    Unseen
    Participant

    To me, Waits seems like a pretentious hipster, most of his stuff never hooks me in enough for a second play. I tried to like his stuff, but I call bullshit, LOL

    Now this is an interesting judgement. I never loved his music, but he certainly impressed me as original, and if anything, perhaps a lot of people who promoted him to fame were hipsters? In a sense, a lot of music is “pretentious” because it relies so heavily on riding on the popularity of previous music. What people buy is actually the most powerful force that determines which personalities get to rise to large attention and playing larger venues. I avoided Led Zeppelin for years because they were so popular, and didn’t appreciate their monumental talent until realizing to take seriously how they built on the shoulders of American Blues music. With that said, here is another favorite of mine who invented his own awesome way to cover some historic hits: <iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/wgIB1OL09H0?feature=oembed” width=”670″ height=”503″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””></iframe>

    Tom Waits is truly an American original. A poet/singer and an actor, too. in 36 movies from 1978 through to this year. If you look at his filmography, you’ll see that many of them were not minor movies.

    The death of Stevie Ray Vaughan was a true tragedy for rock guitar afficionados everywhere  In many ways, he was the successor to Jimi Hendrix.

    #28305

    Unseen
    Participant

    Dems are not killing democracy, everyone is. Including the media. Or should I say the media and any social media, network, etc…

    I fear you may have viewed the subject line as maybe a typo. “Demos” is not “Dems” misspelled. It is Greek for “the people,” “the populace,” or “the citizenry.”

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by  Unseen.
    #28302

    Unseen
    Participant

    So now our corporations play us against Chinese slave labor. Trump wants lower interest…yeah why save any money? spend, spend, spend. So many boomers will work till the end and drop and die where they work.

    They want to guilt-trip us for using plastic straws rather than paper straws or for not recycling our cans and bottles while they cause an asthma epidemic and change the climate with their practices.

    #28301

    Unseen
    Participant

    If “proof” has to satisfy Descartes’ Evil Genius, nothing can be proven. Not even in math and logic.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 795 total)