Sunday School

Sunday School July 24th 2022

This topic contains 39 replies, has 7 voices, and was last updated by  jakelafort 2 weeks, 3 days ago.

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  • #43843

    You can only laugh at this as it could not possibly happen that she gets elected. I mean it’s Alaska, not Maryland.

    In the face of Fact, the Supreme Court chose Faith. (NYT opinion piece).

    I have been considering setting up my own church.

    Christian nationalism is a threat to the American way of life.

    The UNHCR has appointed a new Special Rapporteur on Freedom of Religion or Belief.

    The Cuddly One is arriving in Canada today on a ‘penitential pilgrimage’. Is he aware of the social-panic over unmarked graves?

    The Catholic church in Scotland ‘put its reputation above child safety’. Hmm, what kind of a reputation did you think it already had?

    Private Christian schools in Australia are happy to damage the self-esteem of students.

    Hemant Mehta is living “rent-free” in hate preacher Aaron Thompson’s head.

    World of Woo:  Conspiracy theorists are scaremongering over self-spreading vaccines.

    Environment: The audacious PR plot that seeded doubt about climate change.

    Why do some people mistrust science, and what can scientists do about it? Improving science literacy would mean changing science education.

    Humans are evolving a new artery.

    Timeline: The Domestication of Animals. But what happens if the world gets too hot for animals to survive? Penguins are no strangers to climate changes.

    What does it mean to be a ‘person’? Different cultures have different answers.

    Reality doesn’t exist until you measure it, a quantum parlor trick confirms.

    Long Reads:  Real psychics failed to foresee all the scammers and fake psychics. Can Science disprove God? Darwin thought that family trees could explain evolution. The hoatzin bird suggests otherwise. Why you can ‘hear’ words inside your head. WOW, I am part of the Universe!

    Sunday Book Club:   Experiencing the Impossible, the science of magic. This Library Extension app might be of use to you.

    Some photographs taken last week.  My new screensaver.

    While you are waiting for the kettle to boil……

    Coffee Break Video:  Brian Cox: Looking billions of years into the Earth’s past…..but does the Past still exist? A good video about the future of AI. The global food crisis, explained.

     

    #43845

    Have a great week everyone!

    #43846

    _Robert_
    Participant

    Ah yes, pics of the week…the world is on fire. If we think politics, war, inflation and supply chain issues are bad now, a few more decades will recalibrate us. Waiting till the last minute to start feeling pain was never a viable option.

    I remember my tenure in corporate. Whenever I brought up long-term anything I was dismissed. Next quarter was all that matters. The clown show we live in is the result. Everything else happens in the wake of boardroom decisions made by our true governors.

    #43847

    Strega
    Moderator

    Thanks, Reg!

    #43848

    Autumn
    Participant

    The Cuddly One is arriving in Canada today on a ‘penitential pilgrimage’.

    If we’re going to ever burn money on a Papal visit for any reason, it should be this. It may be politicking on behalf of the Vatican, but it’s not my business to tell FNIM Peoples what makes sense for their Truth and Reconciliation process.

    Is he aware of the social-panic over unmarked graves?

    The thing is, Canadians have been coming out of our bubble that our history with Indigenous peoples was not so bad. Our country was built off fucking them over time and time again, whereas we like to paint a picture where we did some bad things, but also some good, and that the bad stuff is all in the past far far away. What’s been chipping away is the veneer that we’re somehow still the good guys in this relationship. What happened is the announcement that hundreds of unmarked grave sites (and a child’s rib bone, I believe) were discovered flipped that cognitive switch in many people’s brains that yes, the reality is far worse that most of us have wanted to admit.

    What’s unfortunate was that it took something as visceral as the idea of mass unmarked graves for Canadians to give the response and acknowledgement that was owed all along. We didn’t suspect abuses and horrors based on the evidence of bodies. We expected to find bodies based on the evidence of abuses and horrors.

    The idea that no bodies have been unearthed has been used for many many months to either downplay the severity of the atrocities committed at these residential schools or deny them completely. Kay is getting miffed about the fact that Indigenous communities haven’t done what would satisfy his curiosity, but why should they have to? It’s a complex matter that’s deeply wounded countless people and communities, not an episode of fucking CSI.

    https://www.thestar.com/opinion/contributors/2022/01/28/genocide-deniers-ask-where-are-the-bodies-of-the-residential-schoolchildren.html

    https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/tk-eml%C3%BAps-kamloops-indian-residential-school-215-exhumations-1.6460796

    #43849

    Strega
    Moderator

    “What’s unfortunate was that it took something as visceral as the idea of mass unmarked graves for Canadians to give the response and acknowledgement that was owed all along. ”

    You see that as unfortunate, but really I think you have to celebrate the apparent fact that Canadians are able to re-examine their flaws and try to address them. Yes it took a visceral event – but at least it actually affected the Canadian perspective.

    Here in the USA, if the November elections go wrong, the Supreme Court will smash all the progress that’s been made, to shit. We will be in the 19th century.

    I would have wanted to believe that the overruling of Roe v Wade would have been sufficiently horrific to cause a similar change in the American psyche.  I have no idea what will happen in the mid-terms in November, but I also have no optimism left. This country is so polarised it’s frightening.

    #43850

    #43851

    Strega
    Moderator

    That’s going to be Walmart, 2024 on Black Friday, I just know it.

    #43852

    @autumnThe thing is, Canadians have been coming out of our bubble that our history with Indigenous peoples was not so bad. Our country was built off fucking them over time and time again, whereas we like to paint a picture where we did some bad things, but also some good, and that the bad stuff is all in the past far far away. What’s been chipping away is the veneer that we’re somehow still the good guys in this relationship. What happened is the announcement that hundreds of unmarked grave sites (and a child’s rib bone, I believe) were discovered flipped that cognitive switch in many people’s brains that yes, the reality is far worse that most of us have wanted to admit.

    If you change “Canadians” (in line 1) to “Irish”, the statement would be equally valid here in Ireland.

    #43853

    @stregaThat’s going to be Walmart, 2024 on Black Friday, I just know it.

    If you are lucky, it will. Target has become too civilized for me. 🙂

    #43854

    Some more of Kent Monkman’s artwork.  You never know what you might see in Walmart on a wet Sunday.

    #43855

    Autumn
    Participant

    You see that as unfortunate, but really I think you have to celebrate the apparent fact that Canadians are able to re-examine their flaws and try to address them. Yes it took a visceral event – but at least it actually affected the Canadian perspective.

    For a time it did, and it’s had some lingering effect. I’m not unappreciative of the fact that some things changed. My problem is if this is what it takes to change our thinking, the our course of adaptation will be far slower than what is needed. Right now, consumerism is one of the driving forces in Canadian life, and it’s bled out to too many facets of our existence. While that may seem a bit of a jump from residential schools, the sad fact is that wealth seems to be a driving force in why we were so brutal to the First People’s in the first place.

    And that same motive is a through line today when it comes to disabilities, the environment, food and water security, poverty, mental health, immigration, racism, policing, military, politics… and so on and so forth. We aren’t designing our society around directly meeting the needs of people so much as perpetuating stability in our current economic system under the questionable belief that it will indirectly benefit people. If we need to find mass graves of tortured children for our society to seriously look at the possibility of meaningful change, we’re in for a rough ride.

    Here in the USA, if the November elections go wrong, the Supreme Court will smash all the progress that’s been made, to shit. We will be in the 19th century. I would have wanted to believe that the overruling of Roe v Wade would have been sufficiently horrific to cause a similar change in the American psyche. I have no idea what will happen in the mid-terms in November, but I also have no optimism left. This country is so polarised it’s frightening.

    For all my criticisms of Canada, I certainly don’t want to trade with you.

    #43856

    Autumn
    Participant

    If you change “Canadians” (in line 1) to “Irish”, the statement would be equally valid here in Ireland.

    I suspect we could insert many nations in that space. We’re not quite as sentient and rational a species as we’d like to tell ourselves. I often get the feeling the same cognitive functions that once gave us tremendous advantage have become increasingly deleterious as we continue to change our environment at a faster pace than we can evolve.

    #43857

    Strega
    Moderator

    Autumn, I’m in Vermont and Canada is directly above us. It’s a 2 1/2 hour drive to the border. I’ll be in touch when we need to flee 🙂

    People say the measure of a society is how it treats its weaker members, which includes children, the old people and the disabled (mental or physical).  I am specifically not including foreigners, as in people not brought up in the community.

    I’ve found in my travels, that so many countries have a pecking order for those three groups, and they’re all different.

    Greece (I am half Greek) is fantastic with children, really good with the elderly, and completely phobic and terrible about the disabled – to the degree of having ‘asylums’ on smaller islands – prisons, so nobody has to see them.

    The UK (I was brought up here) is pretty good with the disabled, not bad with children, but the amount of elder abuse reported at old peoples homes in the UK is horrific.

    I know there are other disadvantaged groups but I was simplifying the differences between societies with some kind of constant comparative.

    #43861

    Autumn
    Participant

    I know there are other disadvantaged groups but I was simplifying the differences between societies with some kind of constant comparative.

    Yeah. We’re talking about complex systems and direct comparisons are often difficult. I can’t say Canada is better than the US as a rule, especially when we account for provincial/ territorial/ state discrepancies. In all my adult life, I’ve never expected perfection from any system anyway. But when you look at the overall thrust driving systems and the philosophy underpinning them, you’d hope to find something that gives you hope. It feels like in many jurisdictions in America they’ve given up even pretending there is an interest in making things better.

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