PopeBeanie

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  • #30941

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    Despite infinite branches existing in the quantum universe or Hilbert space only one outcome can collapse into event space at every instance. I subscribe to Penrose’s supposition, that Hilbert space is a reality and not just a mathematical construct. A Quantum God would be privy to that reality and existing outside of event space with definite spooky action at a distance in time or space.

    LOL, thank you for humoring me. So it seems we agree, mostly, and definitely in the same space-time space, er, universe. 🙂

    Edit: Now I wish I had used the word homeostasis instead of equalizer. Perhaps on the next timeline…

    #30923

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    So I have at least one amateur hour question. Preceded with at least one amateur hour supposition.

    Supposition (open for your corrections): Either–as I think Jake spoke to–1) there are near-infinite branches, of which none will ever meet again and we can never prove or disprove their existence or empirical natures; or 2) perhaps similarly but nowhere near near-infinite-wise, universes can merge back together almost instantly due to some unexpected law regarding conservation of quantum probability. (Yes, I just made that one up.) I.e. maybe spooky action at a distance has to happen not only in the entanglement that we would see, but with another underlying/invisible entanglement that we wouldn’t presently know how to see, that undoes the previous spooky action at a distance, e.g. with spooky anti-action at a distance. Shazam, two complementary mysteries are better than one, right!? Bringing us immediately back from two universes to one; same old single universe returns every time.

    But here’s the bigger question, assuming I’m wrong above, so split/duplicate universes happen all the time and I just need to get over it. Are there any calculations that predict how often such splits happen? Like, if there are a bazillion such splits nearby, happening a bazillion times per millennium or even per second, then maybe there IS like a Quantum God just having fun with us, or maybe there are even a bazillion Quantum Gods who don’t even ever see each other and meet, much less get to know each other very well. AND FURTHERMORE, does a split that’s caused by some Quantum God a bazillion light years from here plus there potentially being all those other localized-Spooky/Quantum-Gods in our shared sphere of influence (or “sub-universe” or whatever it should be called at any instance in time)… it makes me forget now if I ever had an important question to start with, much less hope anyone can provide a useful answer.

    See, my first proposition is the best. Or (I think) it’s officially my Supposition #2. I dunno, everything appears to me as Quantum-Conflated now.

    So I digressed. Still, I shall name this the “do-undo double-action invisible-probability pilot-wave-equalizer phenomenon” (DDIPP for short), and you are my witnesses when it’s time for the Nobel guys to pick their winners.

     

     

    #30918

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    Fact Checker Websites

    Preliminary list, subject to updates. Comments and additions appreciated!

    [First link is to their website, second link to their RSS. Some browsers handle RSS feeds nicely, presenting a clean list of stories. But if yours doesn’t, it will merely present a lot of harmless geeky-looking code to you. More info later on good RSS readers and browser extensions.]

    • FactCheck.ORG Nicely broken down topic categories. Lot’s of Trumpisms (so I’m also stay wary of possible biases). RSS feed: 10 most recent stories. Stated Affiliation: “A Project of The Annenberg Public Policy Center”
    • Snopes.com Their  front page focuses more on current stories, some of them rather trivial (imo). Search bar at the top helps you avoid that. RSS feed: 10 most recent stories. Stated Affiliation: David Mikkelson, Brad Westbrook, and Chris Richmond.

     

    #30917

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    A couple more stories via Nieman, and during our pandemic’s relatively early stages:

    Nieman: How a Boston Globe website started connecting those in need because of coronavirus with those who can help

    Excerpts [emphasis on a paragraph is mine]:

    As local news outlets suffer blow after blow in this pandemic, Boston Helps is a reminder that local news outlets are an invaluable resource in a person’s day-to-day life. While The Washington Post and The Guardian have compiled lists of general ways to help your community, Boston Helps connects you directly to a person that you can help.

    […]

    Once someone who needs help or someone who can help submits their information in the Google Form, it gets fed into a conditionally formatted and color-coded Google Sheet. From there, it’s easy for Karolian and others on his team to match people up. He said that because things were moving so fast, they opted to use off-the-shelf Google tools.

    […]

    The idea is spreading. After talking with Karolian about Boston Helps, The Dallas Morning News’s marketing and product teams worked with an existing partner and launched a widget that does something similar. At the bottom of every DMN story about the coronavirus, users see two boxes where they can select that they want to help or need help. This feature is available to any United States media company that wants to implement it, chief product officer Mike Orren said.


    An Australian story [excerpts, paragraph emphasis mine]:

    News Corp Australia will stop printing 60 of its local newspapers next week, including the New South Wales title the Manly Daily, which has been in print since 1906.

    […]

    The move came days after Rupert Murdoch’s Australian newspapers warned of “inevitable” job cuts and forced staff to take leave.

    The executive chairman of News Corp, Michael Miller, said the decision was brought on by the collapse of the real estate and entertainment industries which halted the papers’ main revenue stream.

    […]

    The Covid-19 pandemic has seen an unprecedented surge in audiences for news websites and TV news, with the top 10 news websites up by 54% on the previous four weeks.

    But the disappearance of advertising revenue as consumer spending sharply contracts is leading to daily layoffs across the industry.

    #30889

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    Here is a very interesting/enlightening graph wrt the amount of testing by country. It’s over a week out of date and I wish this source would update it (and present it as “per capita”), but it’s still enlightening from a historical perspective:

    graph of covid-19 testing, per country

    And there is still a shortage of available test kits in my area.

    #30885

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    I actually heard one “expert” ask “Are you disinfecting your keys when you come home?” That seems a bit far. Maybe I should burn my clothes when I get home.

    I listen to a virology podcast every week, presented by real experts in the field, often with a guest expert in or near the front lines. One interesting fact learned about microbes in general (and I believe coronaviruses have been tested too), the more copper an item has in it, the faster the microbe/virus will be killed. Like on most keys, and brass. Metal like handrails on public transportation vehicles also mitigate transfer of live microbes, but there is still a half-life of an hour or so while they’re viable.

    Those can be considered in reasonable guidelines, but it’s still always a numbers game that’s not predictable enough. If someone’s shedding a lot of viruses, even brass won’t kill them all instantly because they can stay live in moisture until the moisture dries.

    These “numbers games” are manifestly difficult for a dangerously large number of people to grasp, especially (as we’ve been seeing around the world) in dense populations. Cities that could have saved themselves if only they had known they should react sooner, and if they had a sufficient number test kits on hand to discover, isolate, and trackback virus carriers.

    And I’m still, even now when NYC is blowing up, seeing a large percentage of Trump lovers saying this is no big deal and that people and media are over-reacting. By “large percentage”, it seems to me like 40% of people who comment on the stories in the newspaper in my area.

    #30793

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    I have to admit, I said I like that source without having been there for a while. I think I like Hemant Mehta’s pov, but honestly haven’t followed him recently. Mea culpa!

    Because my desire includes attracting outsiders, including religionists who may be ready to open their minds to a viable option. While appreciating members regardless of their pov. I’d say freedom and tolerance is my mantra, but not for the “intolerant”, e.g. theocracies and their supporters; and except for theocratic tendencies in governments like the “righteousness” we’re seeing most recently in USA.

    #30781

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    @robert, I like Friendly Atheist, thank you.

    #30768

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    A great Michael Shermer episode just came out: SCIENCE SALON # 109 Neil Shubin — Some Assembly Required: Decoding Four Billion Years of Life, from Ancient Fossils to DNA

    Play it or download it from: Episode 109 detail page

    Science Salon Podcast page

    #30767

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    Wow, Louisiana already has the third highest rate of covid per capita in USA. Sounds like a Darwin Award may be in order, some time around mid-April I’d guess.

    #30729

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    “Just catch me up, quick”: How The Wall Street Journal is trying to reach non-news junkies – News products that the Journal built to highlight its election coverage to occasional readers are being repurposed for coronavirus coverage.

    [full story (NiemanLab)]

    [excerpts]

    The Wall Street Journal spent months designing, testing, and perfecting a slate of tools and news products around what was sure to be the year’s biggest story: the 2020 elections. Then…coronavirus.

    […]

    This week, after a few more head-spinning news cycles, the election catch-up module on the homepage has been converted to coronavirus information. And the live coverage that’s outside the paywall? That’s where you can find highlights and to-the-minute updates […]

    […]

    […] Last month, it announced it had passed 2 million paying subscribers, a number only The New York Times can top among American newspapers. But the fact that its paywall is harder than most of its competitors — not to mention its high sticker price for a digital sub, $39/month — means it has to be more creative than its peers in both attracting and converting new readers.

    […]

    The Journal tested the catch-up module at a variety of times (morning, midday, even late Friday afternoons) before settling on weekdays at lunchtime, based on engagement patterns and site traffic. […]

    […]

    A Pew study in January found it was one of only three news outlets (along with PBS and the BBC) that both Democrats and Republicans trust more than distrust. An earlier study found that the Journal’s audience is remarkably evenly distributed across the ideological spectrum. (Among conservatives, the Journal’s news reporting benefits from the paper’s hard-right editorial pages.)

    “We’ve found that the Journal is in a great place to be a political news source because we’re so highly trusted on the left and the right. It’s a unique position to be in,” Story said. “That’s part of our thinking around the live Q&A and the other things that have to do with being more transparent and open to questions.”

    #paywalledNews

    • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by  PopeBeanie. Reason: moved this post down a bit just to improve the flow of stories and replies a bit
    #30728

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    Ready for all the tax payer funded corporate bailouts orchestrated by the very folks who despise socialism?

    I just wish it could have come earlier, in the form of promoting health care. Obama-hate (and Hillary-hate?) helped set the country back on those counts, and (imo) now the worm must turn to repair the economy, more than it otherwise would have had to.

    Meanwhile I’m glad Bernie’s on his way out, because even now in the current pandemic, his openly-social agenda would still definitely fail Dems in 2020.

    #30724

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    Local News Outlets Dealt a Crippling Blow by This Biggest of Stories – Layoffs. Canceled print editions. Weekly papers and small dailies across the country face peril as the coronavirus cuts off ads and live events.

    [full story (NYT)]

    [excerpts]

    […]

    “One of the big problems with all of this is you don’t know when this is going to end,” he said in the interview. “Even when people can go out of their houses again, it’s going to take a long time for business to come back to what it was.”

    The pandemic is one of the biggest stories most publications will ever cover. But it has left many of them struggling to stay solvent.

    Alternative weeklies and daily papers in small and midsize cities across the United States were already suffering because of the recession last decade, the migration of readers from print to online and the decline of the advertising business. Since 2004, roughly one-fourth of American newspapers — more than 2,000 — have been lost to mergers or shutdowns, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina. Most were weeklies.

    The arrival of the coronavirus shook the industry’s already weakened economic foundation. As ad revenue and the money generated by events sponsored by small publications started to evaporate, many papers have canceled print editions, laid off workers or asked readers for donations.

    […]

    Larger publications have also made adjustments. The most drastic response from a major metropolitan daily has come out of New Orleans and Baton Rouge, La., where The Advocate and The Times-Picayune — now one news organization, after The Advocate bought The Times-Picayune last year — will furlough 10 percent of the work force, the editor, Peter Kovacs, said Monday.

    The furlough will focus on journalists who cover sports and social events, and everyone else will be reduced to four-day workweeks, Mr. Kovacs said. He attributed the need to declines in ad revenue, even as web traffic and new digital subscriptions have increased substantially.

    Mark Thompson, the chief executive of The New York Times Company, said this month that he anticipated total advertising revenues to drop more than 10 percent in the current quarter amid “uncertainty and anxiety about the virus.”

    The losses have been exacerbated by demands by companies that their ads not appear next to articles about death tolls and hospitalizations. […]

     

    #30710

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    I have an unpublished paper that was submitted to the Journal; physical review A, that combines chaos and QM. In one section I used a recursive transform typically used to generate Julia sets (similar to the famous Mandelbrot set to generated the 2p orbital shell around a hydrogen atom using the Bohm model and not the Heisenberg model which is more advanced.

    If you’re willing to accept me as a peer, we can publish this. Just don’t expect me to understand it. 🙂

    #30648

    PopeBeanie
    Moderator

    The increase since 1980 exceeds population growth. And the number of 8 magnitude earthquakes unprecedented.

    wtf, His flood didn’t work? Or was that just for giggles? As for quakes, when do you get to decide what you’re seeing is not just a natural swarm that will end soon?

    And the Satan meme, God just lets him do whatever he wants? Lets mothers, babies and children suffer… or makes them suffer? Why!? Or is that why he made us… and let Satan rule?

    And so we’re supposed to believe in him, when it takes an unusually intelligent person to find some kind of sense in all the haze of scriptures written by mere mortal, fallible humans?

    If God planned that whole game out for us, he’s quite the trickster.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 710 total)