Sunday School

Sunday School 30th January 2022

This topic contains 92 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  TheEncogitationer 3 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 93 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #40969

    GOP lawmaker admits that “the whole point of” religious exemptions is to allow discrimination.

    Southern Baptists continue to debate what to say about Christian nationalism which is now the embraced by the far right extremists.

    America is not really a Christian nation, as some would claim. Is it’s increasing secularization a good trend?

    The religious beliefs that drive an inhumane criminal justice system.

    QAnon beliefs can lead to the slaughter of the innocents just like Faux News kills its viewers. (See last video below).

    Netflix’s first Arabic-language film sparks uproar in Egypt.

    World of Woo: Does Acupuncture increase red and white blood cells and T-cells?

    Environment: Climate Change is pushing Greenland over the edge.

    I still ask people to explain what they mean by spiritual. Maybe they mean a journey to a new state of mind? Memories are windows just as books are doors.

    The oldest known remains of modern humans in Africa have been determined. Some of descendants may have walked along this track. Did our ancestors eat as much meat as we have assumed they ate?

    Cosmic Irony; We are discovering secrets about the creation of the Universe and at the same time we now know that the Universe is disappearing, and we’re powerless to stop it.

    “For the first time he perceived that if you want to keep a secret you must also hide it from yourself.” George Orwell 1984.

    Long Reads: Why Environmentalists pose a bigger obstacle to effective Climate Policy than Denialists. Are we living in an era of Unnatural Selection? A history of Comic Books.

    Sunday Book Club: How Civil Wars Start.

    Some photographs taken last week.

    While you are waiting for the kettle to boil……

    Coffee Break Video:  Channel 4 interview with Richard Dawkins. The dream of educating Afghan girls lives on. The Evil God challenge. Brianna Keilar rolls the tape on Fox’s Covid-19 vaccine misinformation.

    #40971

    Have a great week everyone!

    Sorry for delay in posting today.

    The Russian navy has decided not to mess with Irish fishermen. Some Irish wit said that we would consider invading Russia if they did not but we decided not to as they have a standing army of more than 1 million soldiers with another 2 million active reservists. There is no way we would be able to feed that many prisoners.

    #40973

    Strega
    Moderator

    Thanks, Reg!!!

    #40974

    Simon Paynton
    Participant

    The religious beliefs that drive an inhumane criminal justice system.

    Religion has a dark side (vengeful punishment) and a light side (peace, love and charity).  Those who concentrate on the dark side, can be pretty unpleasant.  Those who concentrate on the light side can be a bit passive-aggressive in my experience, they need to learn how to stand up for themselves in a constructive way.

    #40977

    TheEncogitationer
    Participant

    Reg,

    Gotta love the plucky Irish spirit in the face of overwhelming evil odds. It’s probably what got them through a lot.

    Here’s another hilarious, happy, and hopeful dispatch from the ongoing Culture War:

    ‘We are desperate for new people’: inside a hate group’s leaked online chats
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/jan/28/leaked-online-chats-white-nationalist-patriot-front

    So basically, the big, bad “Hooded Night Riders” are no different than the Suburban Soccer-Mom Spin and StairStep class two months after New Year’s Day. Talk about a “Lost Cause!” 😁

    And the terror cell of Aryan Pure Supermen is really the local Amway/HerbalLife franchise hard up to move up a level in their sales matrix. Hey, Klaus! Give us that Happy Merchant Hand Rub! 😆😅

    So this is what “White Privilege” and “systemic racism” are supposed to look like? Pardon me while I laugh! 😂🤣😜

    And if these guys are actually FBI Agents, that says something even more pathetically funny.

    #40987

    Simon Paynton
    Participant

    I still ask people to explain what they mean by spiritual. Maybe they mean a journey to a new state of mind?

    From the article:

    if we take ‘spiritual’ to mean perceiving, communicating with and being influenced by forces (eg, spirits) that other people are not aware of, then the presence of spirituality in psychosis is high. On the other hand, if we think of spirituality as something loving, not exactly religious, but more secular and slightly abstract, then the overlap between spiritual epiphanies and psychosis is not so obvious.

    I don’t buy the idea that spiritual awakening, and psychosis, are similar, except superficially.  I had a spiritual awakening in 2005, and I’ve hardly stopped laughing ever since, which is nice.  I also had psychosis in the winter of 2017-18, which was brewing up for about four years, during which I made a massive nuisance of myself to those around me, especially in the final acute phase.

    However, it’s possible that both of them had the same underlying cause (trauma).

    I see spirituality as psychological transformation from a worse state to a better state.  That doesn’t really have anything to do with psychosis, except when one gets better, and maybe reorganises oneself for the better.

    Steve Taylor writes very well on spiritual awakening (“The Leap”, “Out of the Darkness” etc.).  The fact that he has twinkly eyes supports his assertion that he went through a spiritual awakening aged around 17.

    #40989

    if we take ‘spiritual’ to mean……

    That is my problem with the word. There is no meaningful definition of  it. Yet it is used by people who seem to think that I know what they mean when they use it but cannot furnish me with a definition upon my asking for one.

    #40990

    _Robert_
    Participant

    Anyone that uses that adjective is just too lazy to find a meaningful word.

    #40991

    Autumn
    Participant

    I’ve never had an issue with it. The vagueness of it sort of worked for me. But then, I think how you encounter the word will probably shape your feelings toward it.

    In the 80s and 90s, (as I am sure you can all recall) churches were pretty good at monopolizing large facets of the human experience and branding them as some sort of connection to God™. Atheists and scientists where somehow typecast as emotionless, without empathy, and incomplete. ‘Spiritual’ became a weird sort of catchall to say ‘yeah, we experience that shit to even without gods because we’re fucking human’.

    Now, personally, I never adopted the term myself. It’s still too steeped in the supernatural, and that cheapens it for me, but when someone like my mom—an atheist and a microbiologist turned science teacher—would use it, I knew what she meant.

    She didn’t mean that crystals had healing powers and that our house needed to be cleansed of ghosts before moving in. She just meant that she experienced all those things that religious people do, only for her it was connection with family, art, nature, and the like that evoked that intuitive sense of wonder, joy, and beauty in life.

    Was that sort of use of ‘spiritual’ vague? Yeah. Could a better word have been found? I guess. But it served its purpose in certain contexts and conversations for me. It’s never really bothered me.

    #40994

    Simon Paynton
    Participant

    There is no meaningful definition of it. Yet it is used by people who seem to think that I know what they mean when they use it but cannot furnish me with a definition upon my asking for one.

    There’s no generally accepted definition of the word.  But I have a very clear one that I use myself.  It’s like “sociopath” – people use it in different ways, so there’s no single definition.

    #40996

    Simon Paynton
    Participant

    I see spirituality as psychological transformation from a worse state to a better state.

    That’s my definition, which is meaningful.  Someone told me about “self-actualisation” which is to attempt to live up to all one’s potentials.  That’s a spiritual practice under this definition.  However, I agree that generally, the term is vague.

    From the military:

    The definition used by the military says that “spiritual fitness” is about core values, beliefs, and the source of one’s meaning in life.

    Also:

    Moral injury (MI) results when military personnel are exposed to morally injurious events that conflict with their values and beliefs. Given the complexity of MI and its physical, emotional, social, and spiritual impact, a holistic approach is needed. While the biopsychosocial aspects of MI are more commonly addressed, less is known of the spiritual dimension and how to incorporate it into treatment that facilitates restoration of one’s core self and mending of relationships with self, others, and the sacred/Transcendent.

    #41013

    Simon Paynton
    Participant

    “For the first time he perceived that if you want to keep a secret you must also hide it from yourself.” George Orwell 1984.

    Is it really true that undergraduate students have to have trigger warnings for “1984”?  They are frightened of what exactly?

    Yet it is one of several literary works which have been flagged up to students at Northampton who are studying a module called Identity Under Construction. They are warned that the module ‘addresses challenging issues related to violence, gender, sexuality, class, race, abuses, sexual abuse, political ideas and offensive language’.

    In addition to Orwell’s book, academics identify several works in the module that have the potential to be ‘offensive and upsetting’ including the Samuel Beckett play Endgame, the graphic novel V For Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd and Jeanette Winterson’s Sexing The Cherry.

    Is the university trying to distance itself from politically incorrect ideas?  Are students frightened of things they might disagree with?

    It seems that Jordan Peterson had some of his ideas wrong in his original crusade against being forced to use gender pronouns.  But there was a wider thrust to his argument – he, and many of us, resented being told what to think and say.  This kind of thing makes students look like infants – snowflakes, if you will.

    #41014

    TheEncogitationer
    Participant

    Simon,

    I found George Orwell’s works to be frightening and still find them frightening…but as the saying goes, I felt the fear and did it anyway…4 times with 1984, 7 times with Animal Farm, and I watched the movie for 1984 from 1984 and the 1954 cartoon of Animal Farm.

    It was a trait once called “courage,” one of the traits that IngSoc tried to drum out of the Proles and which PC/Wokeism has drummed out of too many today.

    Here for your dining, dancing, and Two-Minute Hate pleasure:

    I didn’t see the 1956 movie version of 1984, but after my vast experience with Orwell, I’m not averse to watching it.

    The real frightening thing nowadays is that 1984 is taken, not as a precautionary tale, but an instruction manual and a means of acclimating people to tyranny. At the latter two functions, it has worked all too well.

    Ah, yes, Eternal Vigilance.

    #41021

    #41022

    Autumn
    Participant

    – he, and many of us, resented being told what to think and say. This kind of thing makes students look like infants – snowflakes, if you will.

    We wasn’t wrong. He lied, then doubled down on the lies when he got some unexpected fame. Jordan Peterson is everything he decries. I mean, the fucknut filed a defamation suit against someone because of what they said about him in a private conversation. If you want to make compelling arguments in this arena, I’d advise you not to lean on his name. You can probably make a stronger argument without him.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 93 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.